Asia, Europe, and the Middle East

 

DOTS-based tuberculosis treatment and control during civil conflict and an HIV epidemic, Churachandpur District, India

Five leading experts in global health collaborated in 2002 to call attention to the profound impact that armed conflict has on people’s health. They took a critical look at the Churachandpur District located in India. The researchers found that in places of armed conflict, health programs were abandoned. Consequently, the region experienced increased levels of tuberculosis. This particular disease rapidly became a cause of morbidity and mortality throughout refugee camps. Thus, it becomes evident that the health of civilians is highly impacted by surrounding conflict.

Rodger, Alison J. et al. “DOTS-based tuberculosis treatment and control during civil conflict and an HIV epidemic, Churachandpur District, India.” World Health Organization. 2002. Web. October 2013. <http://www.scielosp.org/pdf/bwho/v80n6/v80n6a08.pdf>.

 

Gulf War and Health

The Committee on Health Effects Associated with Exposures during the Gulf War published a book that focuses on post-war health issues. This source analyzes the association between a wide variety of biological and chemical agents from the Gulf War and the adverse health effects currently experienced by a large number of veterans from both Iraq and Kuwait. Those who fought in the war suffered severe post-traumatic stress disorder and other drastic health effects. The health aftermath also plagued the lives of the families of these soldiers.

Fulco, Carolyn E. et al. Gulf War and Health. Vol. 1. National Academy Press: Washington DC, 2000. Web. October 2013. <http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9953&page=R1>.

 

Syria: In a Doctor’s Words

This article was written for the coalition Safeguarding Health in Conflict, which aims to provide resources to protect health workers, services, and infrastructure. Author Sarah Dwyer, a communications manager at IntraHealth International, targets how conflicts have impacted the health of people living in Syria. It is evident that there is an influential relationship between a country’s armed conflict and the state of health of its citizens. Dr. Qasem al Zein was head of a hospital in Syria when the revolution began. He has continued to work towards protecting the health of the Syrian people even though he puts his own life at risk in the process. Dr. Qasem al Zein’s account is a courageous story that highlights the unbelievable impact armed conflict can have on a population’s state of health.

Dwyer, Sarah. “Syria: In a Doctor’s Words.” Safeguarding Health in Conflict. 26 July 2013. Web. October 2013. <http://www.safeguardinghealth.org/syria-in-a-doctors-words>.

 

Impact of the Bosnian conflict on the health of women and children

During the Bosnian war in the 1990s, the health of local women and children was greatly impacted. The authors explain, “The war from 1992 to 1995 left the country’s resources devastated and, from a population of 4.5 million, an estimated 250, 000 people (including 16,000 children) are believed to have died in the conflict or are missing.” During the war, there was a deterioration in the health services for women and children, and subsequently their health was negatively affected as well.

Kinra, Sanjay, et al. “Impact of the Bosnian conflict on the health of women and children.” World Health Organization. 2002. Web. October 2013. <http://www.scielosp.org/pdf/bwho/v80n1/v80n1a15.pdf>.

 

Growth and development of children aged 1–5 years in low-intensity armed conflict areas in Southern Thailand: a community-based survey

Written by scholars from the Songkla University in Thailand, this report investigates the impact that conflict has had on children in Southern Thailand. The growth and development of children between 1 and 5 years old was affected in low-intensity armed conflict areas in Southern Thailand. The authors discovered that in these areas, rates of growth retardation, stunting, wasting, and underweight children were high. Using statistics from a study, the authors made the conclusion that armed conflict in Thailand did indeed have a profound impact on the growth, development, and overall health of children living in this area.

Jeharsae, Rohani, et al. “Growth and development of children aged 1–5 years in low-intensity armed conflict areas in Southern Thailand: a community-based survey.” Conflict and Health. 2013. Web. October 2013. <http://www.conflictandhealth.com/content/pdf/1752-1505-7-8.pdf>.

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