Gender Equality

Girls kick violence with Grassroot Soccer

Grassroot Soccer, Inc. is a civil society organization founded in 2002 by four male professional soccer players who saw the effects that HIV and AIDS had on their teammates. In 2009, the organization developed SKILLZ Street, a program focused on coaching and mentoring young adolescent girls, since they are “at a higher risk for HIV infection than their male peers,” said UN Women. SKILLZ Street aims to empower girls, raise awareness of sexual and reproductive health, and increase girls’ access to medical, legal, and psychosocial services through soccer coaching and mentoring.

UN Women. “Girls kick violence with Grassroot Soccer.” United Nations. 2 June 2015. Web. 9 October 2015. <http://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2015/6/girls-kick-violence-with-grassroot-soccer>.

 

Malala Turns 18, And Opens A School For Syrian Refugee Girls

Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl who survived a gunshot in the head in 2012, recently turned 18 and has opened a secondary school for Syrian refugee girls in Lebanon. The school is funded by Malala’s own nonprofit organization and will enroll more than 200 teenage girls. In addition to a four-year baccalaureate program, there will be vocational courses available to those unable to complete the entire program, supporting young people in their search for employment. Malala has been a female education advocate for years. At age 11, she started a blog for the BBC in which she detailed her life under Taliban occupation. Malala is also known for being the youngest Nobel Peace Prize recipient, which she received at the age of 17.

Bloch, Hannah. “Malala Turns 18, And Opens A School For Syrian Refugee Girls.” National Public Radio. 12 July 2015. Web. 9 October 2015. <http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/07/12/422358157/malala-turns-18-and-opens-a-school-for-syrian-refugee-girls?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_ term=nprnews&utm_content=20150712>.

 

Meet The 15-Year-Old From Rural Guatemala Who Addressed The U.N.

Emelin is part of the Maya Mam indigenous group living in Concepción Chiquirichapa, a rural town in the highlands of Guatemala. The biggest issues that the youth in her community are facing are “early pregnancy, childbirth, sexual violation and lack of education and health care.” Emelin was only 13 when she asked the mayor of her town to help resolve the issues of girls staying in school and getting better health care, to which he laughed and said was a waste of time. Through Let Girls Lead, a nonprofit organization that gives young girls the tools to advocate for their rights, Emelin made an impression on her community that seven months later made the mayor sign a legislation to fund education and health care initiatives pertaining to girls.

Cole, Diane. “Meet The 15-Year-Old From Rural Guatemala Who Addressed The U.N.” National Public Radio. 12 March 2015. Web. 9 October 2015. <http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2015/03/12/392174520/meet-the-15-year-old-from-rural-guatemala-who-addressed-the-u-n>.

 

How gender hierarchies matter in youth activism: young people’s mobilizing around sexual health in Ecuador and Peru

Gender constructs determine what to expect from a person based solely on their gender, which can be prohibiting. This article is the product of a study that looks at how gender hierarchy intersects with youth activism, sometimes limiting and controlling youth mobility and action. The research focuses on sexual health activists in Ecuador and Peru, looking specifically at four organizations: Among Friends, The Ponte Once Network, Organizations in Pucallpa, and National articulations in Ecuador.

Coe, Anna-Britt, Isabel Goicolea, and Ann Öhman. “How gender hierarchies matter in youth activism: young people’s mobilizing around sexual health in Ecuador and Peru.” Journal of Youth Studies. Vol. 16, No. 6. 21 November 2012. Web. 10 October 2015. <http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13676261.2012.744815>.

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