Aug 29
2006
11:43 AM
Aug 29
2006
9:44 AM

Student hero

Kudos to 2L David Voyles for saving the life of an elderly pedestrian who apparently did not hear the alarm at the Old Town trolley crossing and was about to step right in front of an oncoming trolley. David’s quick action in restraining the man averted a potential tragedy.

Aug 29
2006
9:28 AM

New study area – “The LRC Commons”

Most of the microforms cabinets that stood for many years just west of the circulation desk on the main level of the library have been moved to the lower level, leaving only the CIS congressional materials, California resources, and selected legal journals in the Information Services area. In place of these cabinets, nine study tables seating four patrons at each one, are now in use in the vacated area, much to the delight of the students, many of whom have quickly settled on this area as their new preferred study site. Ear plugs in place, silenced cell phones propped up before them, and laptops blinking away, these students are happy to research and study in this brightly lit area that is within easy access of the reference librarians, the rest rooms, and a quick break outside.

Researchers seeking microforms that have been relocated will find that the new location, LRC Lower Level Microforms, has already been assigned to these materials in the SALLY catalog records. LRC reference librarians are available to those patrons needing further assistance in locating these items.

Aug 29
2006
9:26 AM

LRC drink & food policy relaxed

Packaged snack food is now allowed in the LRC as long as it does not make a mess or bother other patrons. Beverage containers must have secure lids. No food or beverages are allowed in computer labs or the lower level of the library. Please take your trash with you or dispose of it before you leave. If you spill or see a mess left behind, let a staff member know right away.  The LRC reserves the right to interpret this policy on a case-by-case basis if food consumption is noisy, smelly, or messy.

Aug 29
2006
9:23 AM

New campus wireless system

ITS is bringing up a new wireless transmission system. With this system and a new authentication appliance, campus network security will be greatly enhanced. In order to log on to the system, users will need to have an active USD e-mail account. They will also need to have on their laptops anti-spyware, virus software, current Windows updates, and NO peer-to-peer software. These limitations will further limit network over-crowding and thereby ensure access for USD users.

Aug 25
2006
8:41 AM

University of California & Google

The Chronicle links to a copy of the book-digitization project contract inked between Google and the University of California — The UC has pledged to provide Google with at least 2.5 million books for the massive digitization initiative:

"Daniel Greenstein, director of the California Digital Library, said Google had committed early on to a core value for the university: public access to the public-domain materials at no cost. They said, "As long as we are alive as a company, or successors are alive using this file, we will make it available for free," he said. "I’ve never seen this from anybody. That was their opening gambit."  [SCOTT CARLSON, "U. of California Will Provide Up to 3,000 Books a Day to Google for Scanning, Contract States,"  The Chronicle [Friday, August 25, 2006] [Chronicle access password protected].

Aug 22
2006
2:59 PM

Brian Leiter’s Law School Reports

Texas Law Professor Brian Leiter begins each new academic year by reposting his thoughts on the "The Socratic Method : The Scandal of American Legal Education" :

"The Socratic method is not as omnipresent as it once was in law schools, but it is still widely used, more or less, in most law schools, by most professors, at least some of the time.

And that’s a scandal. For there is no evidence–as in "none"–that the Socratic method is an effective teaching tool. And there is much evidence that it’s a recipe for total confusion."

(Hat tip Law Librarian Blog)

Aug 15
2006
11:23 AM

Larry Tribe On Executive Signing Statements

ACSBlog has posted Professor Tribe’s thoughts on the ABA Signing Statement Report — 

"Laurence H. Tribe is the Carl M. Loeb University Professor at Harvard University …My starting point — and it is one I share with what I take to be the views of the ABA panel on signing statements — is alarm at the unprecedented frequency with which the incumbent President has signed congressional enactments into law — including enactments that seem to me entirely constitutional exercises of Congress’s power to structure the executive branch; regulate that branch’s military and civilian investigations, prosecutions, or detentions; or engage in one of Congress’s other undoubted heads of lawmaking authority — while brazenly signaling his position and that of his administration that giving those enactments their intended effect would cut impermissibly into his breathtakingly inflated conception of illimitable presidential power and prerogative…"

Aug 15
2006
11:13 AM

Cataloging Fun With Dewey And Cats

From 025.431 : Dewey Blog

"Collections of fiction in which a cat helps solve a mystery would be built using our favorite Table 3.  First you have 808.83 Collections of fiction, then you have to decide between 808.831-808.838 Specific scope and types of fiction (i.e., mystery stories) and 808.839 Fiction displaying specific features (i.e., fiction about cats).  The Manual note at 808.8 gives preference to specific themes and subjects (i.e., cats), but that is over-ridden by the reference at 808.839: "Class fiction of specific scope and types displaying specific features in 808.831-808.838."  So we follow the instruction at 808.831-808.838 and add 872 from T3B–30872 Detective, mystery, suspense, spy, Gothic fiction in Table 3B, and get 808.83872.  At this point, we follow the instructions at T3B–30872, which say that subdivisions are added for mystery fiction alone, and that you add as instructed under T3B–102-107.  Here, we are told to add 08 Collections of literary texts, then notation from Table 3C.  In Table 3C, we go to T3C–362 Animals, then add "the numbers following 59 in 592-599, e.g., cats T3C–3629752".  You should check in the schedules that 599.752 Felis includes domestic cats (even though the interdisciplinary number for domestic cats is over in 636.8 Cats).  And you get 808.83872083629752, meaning collections of detective, mystery, suspense, spy, Gothic fiction from more than two literatures with animals of the genus Felis as a subject…"