Tag Archives: testimonial

Political and Economic Developments in Europe – Heather Thomas

I am in my first year at the University of San Diego in the Professional MBA program. My undergraduate studies concentrated on cultural anthropology, specifically linguistics. Inspired by the desire to capture dying languages as relics of human expression, I have always been thrilled by the human experience. Taking a plunge into a new field, I see the same themes arise in the inherent social nature of business. The unavoidable road towards a global era is intertwining industries and firms on a level never before seen. Political and social happenings worldwide are changing the world we live in every day with exciting new technologies and a beautiful immersion of cultures. In my quest to discover more about the global changes taking place, and the interconnectivity of it all, I am determined to take my learning experiences abroad as often as possible.

The first, of many more, began in Lisbon and ended in Madrid.

Europe has lived through some incredibly noteworthy changes in recent years. As part of the European Union, in both Portugal and Spain I encountered a significant amount of concern, or at least a prevalent curiosity, about the future of the EU post-Brexit. Will it impact future global trends in trade relations? Will it prompt other European member nations to take action for separation from the union?

The economic union is currently the most robust integration of nations and has succeeded in making Europe a major international power. Lecturers, Francisco Torres and Mario Weitz Schneir, appeared not to fear Brexit and suggest it may be more of a loss for the UK than the remaining nation states. It does, however, bring into question the need to confront the rise of populist movements, a result of economic uncertainty and increasing concerns of globalization.

Another topic of significant impact in the last 10 years is the global financial crisis of 2008. Both Portugal and Spain have not fully recovered and also suffered a severe economic blow during the European debt crisis in 2009. Unemployment rates remain high but are on a steady inline, at just under 19% in Spain and 10% in Portugal compared to 4.3% in the US. The economic systems in both countries are seemingly in repair and investment in technology, education and energy appear promising. With so much transformation, it will be interesting see how things develop.

There are three main things I learned on this program. First, I learned to examine business in a more holistic manner, taking in cultural and historical aspects and exploring their implications. I learned that although Portugal is moving away from tourism as a major industry and into more lucrative sectors, there is no denying the appeal of the city of Lisbon. And finally, for anyone afraid of drinking up an appetite in Spain, you will never be short of Tapas.

To check out more student experiences, please visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

The Eurozone & the Greek Crisis: Strategies for Global Innovation & Competitiveness

By Philip Sheridan, MBA student

Due to my interest in strategic planning and innovation management, I participated in the 2015 Munich & Athens study abroad program with the intent to study strategies for global innovation, and how the political, legal and ethical climate can impact a country’s corporate and economic development. Despite the improving economic climate for a number of states within the European Union (EU), the tensions created by the current Greek crisis provided a unique (possibly historical) opportunity to learn first-hand how each country’s respective business and economic environment is impacting the health of the EU.

Munich plaza SU15

Plaza in Munich, Germany

The EU consists of 27 member states (countries), of which Germany is considered Europe’s economic engine, with a longstanding record of high employment and productivity. Kicking off our studies, two lecturers (Dr. Richard Hofmaier, University of Applied Sciences Munich; Alexander Lang, Tu Munchen) described how the main driving forces (~99%) behind Germany’s economy are small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs; up to 500 employees), referred to as the ‘German Mittlestand’ or ‘hidden champions’. Roughly 95% of Mittlestand firms are family-owned businesses, of which >54% have launched an innovation onto the market, contributing almost 52% of Germany’s economic output within the EU (~27% of EU GDP). Dr. Hofmaier and Mr. Lang eluted to how most successful German firms (large or small) try to capture the spirit of these ’hidden champions’ to drive innovation, and integrate knowledge of consumer-demands into their innovation management and product development practices and processes.

BMW Manufacturing World Headquarters

BMW Manufacturing World Headquarters

The innovation practices discussed by Hofmaier and Lang provided a great international context for our course studies in global innovation management, particularly as it relates to ideation, opportunity identification, option development, synthesis and analysis. Together with Dr. Zimmermann, we discussed these topics and relevant case studies used by global organizations trying to establish and sustain innovative cultures. These class discussions and experiential exercises provided great exposure to practices and contextual tools that I can leverage in my strategic planning and business development activities.

Our time in Germany culminated with site visits to the BMW Manufacturing World Headquarters, as well as the Strascheg Center for Entrepreneurship (within the University of Applied Sciences). At BMW, we observed how a large enterprise marries customer-focused development with innovative production methods to maintain their competitive edge and increase manufacturing efficiency.

At the Strascheg Center, we learned how the German government invests resources to establish entrepreneurship programs and seed university business incubators. We had the unique experience to hear from two start-up cofounders as to the resources provided by the center to help them develop and deliver their innovative products to the market.

20150531_174506

Winning culinary team relaxing after the Athens Sensations Tour

Following our acclimation to Athens through a program sponsored ‘Athens Sensations Tour’, we started our studies in Greece with an orientation by Dean Nickolaos Travlos from the Athens Laboratory of Business Administration (ALBA). Dean Travlos framed out key financial events that led to Greece’s current economic crisis, which today is characterized by excessive debt (debt to GDP >170%), an over-bearing public sector (>50% public companies), non-competitive government policies (low government efficiency, 56/59), and a significant ‘black economy’ (>30%). As a result, the Greek government faces overwhelming pension obligations, extremely high unemployment (>25%; >50% for youths), a deflated private business sector (low business efficiency index, 53/59), and significant lost tax revenues due to the black economy.

Visit to Apivita, a natural cosmetics company

Of particular interest was a presentation by Prof. Babis Mainemelis (ALBA) who emphasized how Greek businesses could leverage their worldly traditions and heritage to spur innovation and differentiate its products on a global business stage. We visited Apivita, a family-owned company that specializes in using natural organic oils, plant extracts and beehive products to formulate holistic cosmetics. We toured their production facility and botanical gardens, including a hands-on experience as to the beekeeping practices used to maintain their hives for generation and collection of natural product ingredients. We also toured the Papagiannakos Winery and enjoyed a history lecture on wine in Greece by food consultant and sommelier Chrissa Giatra. It was interesting to hear how these two family businesses were leveraging their unique success in Greece to expand within the European market.

Athens ruins flag

Ancient ruins in Athens, Greece

It will be interesting to follow future economic developments within the EU. Will there be a Grexit (Greek exit from the EU)? Could this lead to a contagion where other countries (Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Italy) also exit rather than continue to institute painful austerity measures (such as labor and market reforms). And what global impact could such developments have on international markets and economies?

While we wait to see what the future holds for Greece and the EU, I can say that the immersive nature of the Munich & Athens program provided direct exposure to these contrasting business environments, and cultures as a whole. The team–based course content and exercises fostered collaboration between individuals from various university programs, and together with lectures by international faculty and company site visits, delivered a unique and exceptional professional learning opportunity every student should have the good fortune to experience. Lastly, it was extremely stimulating to learn about these historical cities and their overall place in the world, from an economic as well as cultural perspective. Most important, it was great fun to meet new people, expand my professional network, and establish new friendships.

 

Read these other blog posts detailing student experiences in Munich & Athens:

Experience Munich and Athens Through the Eyes of a Student

Summer Sojourn to Europe: An Academic Fortnight in Munich & Athens

What Students are Saying About Munich & Athens

 

Check back soon for more student experiences abroad!  

For more information on Ahlers Center opportunities, visit our study abroad webpage.

Brand Management in the Global Context #3

3 Seminars: February 26, March 5 & 12.

Price includes all three seminars.

According to an Accenture report, nearly 60 percent of the aggregate value of the U.S. stock market is based on investor expectations of future growth. These future values are tied to the intangible assets that are, in most cases, tied to brand equity. Whether you are in marketing, operations, finance, human resources or any other area, it is important to understand how you can help contribute to the growth of your company’s brand or brands’ value over time on a global scale.

A strategically sound brand management strategy is critical to any company’s future success, whether it is B-to-C or B-to-B. A well-managed brand(s) will ensure your company is positioned to be globally competitive with sustainable and profitable growth.

Learning Objectives

  • Develop and articulate a clear brand strategy that includes:
    • Brand architecture
    • Brand positioning
    • Brand story
  • Develop and execute a brand marketing strategy and model that will meet the company’s vision
  • Identify some of the key challenges facing brand management in the current consumer environment

Total Seminar Hours: 9

Seminar Leader

GomezThomas Yang has had a successful career as a results-oriented senior executive leader of global brand and general management with Proctor & Gamble, Coca-Cola, Clorox, Starbucks, Del Monte and, most recently, Callaway. Thomas has had responsibilities with revenue ranging from $450 million to $5 billion in North America, Japan, China, Europe, Korea, SE Asia, Middle East, Africa, Latin America and India. He has been recognized for driving and maximizing sales and profits of global brands in both developed and developing markets. He has served in positions of senior executive leadership at the local, regional and global levels while having lived and worked across the world in seven different countries.

Currently, Thomas is an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego and serves as a partner at PrimeGenesis, the leading senior executive transition firm where he leads senior level executive assignments across the world. Separately, Thomas is the founder & CEO of YMPETUS, a firm focused on advising senior executives on growth strategies, branding and business modeling. He graduated from the University of Colorado with a bachelor’s degree in marketing and holds a master’s degree in international management from the American Graduate School of International Management (Thunderbird) in Arizona.

Student Semester Exchange Experience in Madrid

 

Written by MBA student Michael Foster.

In the fall of 2014, I had the opportunity to study at IE Business School in Madrid. I recommend to anyone doing an MBA at USD to consider going abroad for a semester as the experience is invaluable to your studies and networking opportunities. The Ahler´s Center makes the transition almost seamless.

IE is ranked as one of the top business programs in Europe, so it attracts extremely diverse and talented students. The professors are a mix of academics and business professionals. Classes often have guest speakers that offer great insights into the European markets. Most recently we had speakers from Realza Capital and MasterCard.

Viewed from Mike Foster's balcony in Madrid

View from Mike Foster’s balcony in Madrid

Living in Madrid has also been a great experience. It’s very pedestrian friendly with a great public transportation system. Gone are the days of sitting on the 5 to go a few miles. Madrid is a world-class city with a rich history. The architecture is amazing and the museum options are incredible. If you attend IE, I highly recommend living in either Malasaña or Chueca. Both these neighborhoods are centrally located and only a few metro stops from the school.

A big advantage of living in Madrid is that flights abroad are cheap. I had the opportunity to spend a week in Morocco. The culture in North Africa is almost the complete opposite of Spain’s, so it was a real eye opener. I spent a few days in Marrakech, Casablanca, and Rabat.

USD´s IE students in Morocco

USD´s IE students in Morocco

If you are considering going abroad for a semester, I definitely recommend IE Business school. The courses I took while in Madrid were: Applied Corporate Finance, Private Equity and Financial Statements, Trillion Dollar Challenges, Bootstrapping for Startups, Corporate Governance, Bottom of the Pyramid, and War, Sales, and Marketing.

MBA Student Michael Foster

MBA Student Michael Foster

Surviving as a Vegetarian While Traveling Internationally

In California, we are spoiled with freshly picked produce year-round, an abundance of vegetarian-friendly restaurants, and an ability to read menus in our native language. However, it’s a completely different story when going abroad! In many other cultures, meat plays a larger role in the diet than it does in the US, and the word “vegetarian” doesn’t always translate very well.  As a long-time vegetarian, I would like to offer some tips that I’ve found useful through my international travels and also share some of my favorite vegetarian-friendly restaurants throughout the world!

Tips:

  • If you are traveling on an Ahlers Center study abroad program, please remember to indicate your dietary restrictions on your application. We typically have several group dinners throughout our programs, and work very hard to accommodate whatever dietary restrictions we have.
  • Pack protein bars or protein powder along with plenty of vitamins! It’s oftentimes a bit more difficult to find quality sources of protein while abroad so I always keep extra protein bars/powder on hand. Also, days can get very long with city tours, company visits and classroom sessions so even non-vegetarians may want to pack some protein bars to keep your body and brain fueled. Along those same lines, your immune system can be compromised while traveling, and you may not always have access to as many fruits and vegetables as you are used to, so bring vitamins while you’re at it too!
  • If you do not speak the native language, translate and carry a card that says  “I am a vegetarian. I do not eat any meat, chicken or fish”. It is important to outline exactly what you do not eat since vegetarianism can mean different things in other parts of the globe.
  • Research vegetarian-friendly restaurants prior to departure. A quick search on happycow.net, Tripadvisor or Yelp should give you plenty of restaurants to explore throughout your journey! You may even want to add the restaurants you find to a Google map to keep organized and make sure you hit up all the best spots!
  • If you rent an apartment or have a kitchenette in your hotel room, be sure to visit the local farmers’ market and cook for yourself! Some of the best produce I’ve ever had came from local markets while traveling abroad, like these asparagus from Aix-en-Provence, which were bigger than my hand!
Cooking up asparagus with olive oil, garlic and herbes de provence….so simple yet so tasty!

Cooking up asparagus with olive oil, garlic and herbes de provence….so simple yet so tasty!

Favorite Restaurants:

While it’s usually easy enough to find cheese pizzas and sandwiches, if you’re anything like me, you’ll be craving more creative plant-based dishes in no time. Here are my favorite vegetarian (or vegetarian-friendly) restaurants in various parts of the world.

  • Istanbul-Istanbul has excellent food, with many vegetarian-friendly options. I stumbled upon Karakoy Lokantasi while exploring the city and knew I had to check it out since it was packed with locals and very cute inside. Vegetarians and non-vegetarians alike will find something to eat on the menu, but my suggestion is to simply make your meal out of a bunch of their mezes, or appetizers!  Everything I ordered was fresh and delicious. Be sure to try their muhammara!
  • Paris (Yes, you can survive as a vegetarian even in Paris!) – Le Potager du Marais is a cute and cozy vegan restaurant in a great part of town. They replicate several classic French dishes like soupe a l’oignon and boeuf bourguignon using plant-based substitutes. Great people watching too if you sit on the patio!
Enjoying people watching and plant-based cuisine on the streets of Paris!

Enjoying people watching and plant-based cuisine on the streets of Paris

  • Rome – If ever in Rome, be sure to sample the city’s famous pasta dish, cacio and pepe, a pasta with a cheese and pepper sauce. Anthony Bourdain and I both highly recommend trying it at Roma Sparita in particular, as they serve their pasta dish in a crispy parmesan cheese bowl and it is delicious! Make a reservation or get there early as this place fills up fast!
  • Rio – It seems as though Rio has a juice bar on every corner, so it’s possible to get almost any type of fruit juice and an acai bowl at any hour! However, I’ve found it a bit more difficult to find fresh vegetables in restaurants, as meat is a huge part of the Brazilian culture. Never fear though! There are plenty of vegetarian restaurants in Rio including two of my favorites: Universo Organico in Leblon and Biocarioca in Copacabana.
  • Madrid – Spaniards love their pork and patatas bravas. If you would like something a bit healthier, go no further than Yerba Buena. I recommend stopping by for their three course lunch special…but be warned, you won’t need to eat for the rest of the day…they serve insanely large dishes and all for a great price!
Course number two at Yerba Buena. You’ll definitely leave there stuffed!

Course number two at Yerba Buena. You’ll definitely leave there stuffed!

Overall, with a little forethought and a bit of research, it is absolutely possible to travel abroad while sticking to your normal dietary choices. Now, tell us about your favorite restaurants below. If you have dietary restrictions, what do you do differently while traveling?

Bon voyage et bon appétit!

– Danielle

Rio Reflections told by an MBA Student: High Quality Opportunity for Learning Beyond the Classroom

By MBA Student Scott M. LaRocco; Edited by Renata Berto & Danielle Levanetz

The beauty of taking a class abroad is that besides being exposed to high quality lectures by USD’s most renown faculty members, one gains awareness of how people in a certain culture live their lives, and how they do business.   In this article, an MBA student shares what lessons he learned while exploring Rio on his free time, outside of the classroom.

I believe that in order to truly experience the most out of a visit to another country, one must be willing to forego many comforts that we are accustomed to, adapt to the culture by attempting to communicate with local residents in their vernacular language, and, most importantly, be willing to take risks. By utilizing my already natural high level of energy and enthusiasm, I believe that I was greatly successful in experiencing the most out of Brazil’s fascinating culture while spending almost a month in Rio de Janeiro taking two MBA classes.

In order to accomplish this, I generally gave up my standard routine of seven hours of sleep per night and three square meals per day. Despite the minor discomfort that these sacrifices may have caused, I can unequivocally say that I was able to experience Rio in a way that many of my fellow classmates did not. Below are a few of those adventures, which have forever changed my life.

Fabiano, Moises, and the Beach Chair Family

Getting a group together for something as simple as going to the beach in Brazil became the equivalent of a four hour root canal procedure. It seemed like every time I was ready to go several people were asking me to wait for them. Frustrated by my inability to have the group ready to go on my schedule, I developed a different strategy to go to the beach: I gave simple instructions as to where exactly I would be sitting on the beach so that anyone could join me.

The advantage to always being in the same beach location, oftentimes alone for several hours, was that I was able to become amicably acquainted with a local family, whose business was to rent out beach chairs, umbrellas and refreshments to beachgoers. The family consisted of three sons, whose ages ranged between 21 and 25 years, and their father who seemed to merely supervise the operation as he played dominoes under a canopy.

The three boys worked extremely hard, running back and forth from their canopy where they stored their chairs for the beach patrons, who need not move from their chairs in order to get a nice cold coconut water. Appreciative of this hard work, I made a concerted effort to not only tip these gentlemen whenever practical, but to do my best to show my appreciation of their service through trying to talk with them, shake their hands, and laugh with them when I could.  This appreciation did not go unnoticed, as they would smile and wave as they saw me approach every time I went to the beach. In addition to merely doing a great service for me and the other beach patrons, these kids also would do me personal favors like watch my bag while I went in the water, if I were alone, or run to their canopy to get me a specific refreshments that they did not carry in their coolers. On one occasion, Moises sat down next to me, looking exhausted, and simply asked to “bump fists”, a universal sign of respect across the globe.

On the last day of my trip I decided I wanted to leave these kids with a gift before I departed back to the United States, so on my last outing to the beach I brought with me a Chicago Bulls Michael Jordan jersey that I had taken with me from the States. Knowing that such jerseys are probably extremely difficult to find in Rio, I thought this would be a great “thank you” gift. Unbeknownst to me, the family had also planned to give me a small gift, so as I walked to Ipanema beach to say goodbye, I pulled out the jersey. At the same time, they had the jersey of their favorite local soccer team, Vasco da Gama, to give to me. I certainly appreciate the irony of how conscientious people, despite cultural differences, can think in the exact same manner. It is my sincere hope that next time I happen to be in Rio de Janeiro, I will walk up and find the same family in the same spot, wearing my Vasco jersey, as one of them wears my Chicago Bulls one.

The Siren’s Song of the Vidigal Favela

Undoubtedly the image from Rio de Janeiro that is forever scorched in my retinas is that of the Dois Irmaos peaks that jaggedly spring up from the west of Ipanema Beach. I had seen these mountains for years on postcards and in films, but was completely unprepared for the scope and natural beauty in them.

Vidigal favela seen from the beach. Picture by http://www.getyourguide.com

Dois Irmãos peaks and Vidigal favela seen from the beach. Picture by http://www.getyourguide.com

When I was able to get my first, in person, view of the peaks, I noticed what appeared to be a shantytown running up the side. “How could this be?” I thought to myself. This looked like some of the most prime real estate in all Rio de Janeiro, yet it had a favela (slum) occupying it. Desperate for more information on this perceived anomaly, I began researching the area and learned that it was indeed a favela called Vidigal. So, on my last day in Rio, I recognized it as my last opportunity to make the possible dangerous trip into the Vidigal favela. After convincing a classmate to go with me, we saw what appeared to be a small restaurant at the base of Vidigal. We decided this would be a good place to find out, once and for all, if it would be safe for us to head into the favela.

At the restaurant, which I viewed more like the base camp at Mount Everest, we were able to speak to a television reporter, who spoke perfect English, about our prospects of making it in and out of Vidigal safely. She assured us that we had nothing to worry about, and that the favela had been pacified, and there would be heavy police presence everywhere we went.  This was enough to convince us that we should take the risk and head in.

Rather, we occasionally saw a police car drive by as we winded our way up the main road, heading for the very top in search of a picturesque view of the City. Despite this, I believe that we had gone too far now to turn back, and so we forged ahead. Along the main street in Vidigal, I never felt threatened. Locals seemed to be going about their everyday business and paid us little attention at all.  As we approached the summit, I was saddened that, from the main street, there were buildings blocking what was certain to be an amazing view of Rio de Janeiro.

Unsatisfied, I pondered heading up one of the many small, winding concrete staircases that disappeared into the morass of corrugated steel shanty houses that packed the neighborhood. As I took my first initial steps up the staircase, and my classmate waited at the base, unwilling to head into what looked like an abyss, reality had a way of finding me again. A local woman shouted out her window and waved her finger to me. She had a look on her face not of someone who simply didn’t want me trespassing, but rather, that if I were to continue I might find myself in real danger. This was enough for me to turn back, and suggest to Tina that maybe we begin the long, winding trek down back to the base.

After deciding to turn back and start walking down, we were happy to find out that the walk down actually did give us periodic windows where we were able to marvel at the scenery. The blue ocean, sandy beaches, white buildings, and emerald peaks that Rio is known for looked as amazing as ever. Additionally, the look, smell, and overall feel of being in a favela is so unique, that I had to fight off the urge to whip out my camera and take pictures (the locals tell tourists that this can be seen as very disrespectful).

About half way down the main road, my classmate and I stopped for a drink at a local bar/restaurant. The owner, a kind old lady, not only was willing to take our pictures, as well as a picture of us with her, but also brought out rice and beans (traditional Brazilian fare) that we hadn’t asked for. Upon our departure, she wished us well and gave us both big hugs as we walked down the road.

I am certainly thrilled that I was able to at last explore the Vidigal favela, and experience both in beauty and charm as we meandered through its winding roads. Had I not taken this opportunity to do so, it would have undoubtedly been my biggest, and possibly only, regret of what was, in totality, and amazing trip.

MBA Students Exploring Rio's Most Iconic Symbol

MBA Students Exploring Rio’s Most Iconic Symbol

 

Study Abroad in Spain and Morocco – Student Testimonial

 

Post by MBA student Andres Deza; Pictures by MBA students Emily Lapp, Fangdanyang Huang, Luis Vidaurri Zuniga, Sunita Redfern and Qiaoling Cai.

The study abroad program to Spain and Morocco was an extremely positive and enlightening opportunity that I was lucky to be a part of. The program helped promote education, networking, and cultural awareness through constructive classroom activities, noteworthy company tours, cultural expeditions, and memorable group dinners. Additionally, it provided an ideal atmosphere in which to meet other students, enhance networking skills, learn from professors, and interact with business professionals in an international setting.

At Esca Management School Exploring Africa's Economic Potential

At ESCA Management School Exploring Africa’s Economic Potential

From an academic perspective, I really enjoyed interacting and learning from a variety of scholars such as: MBA students from other cohorts at USD, individuals from the MSGL program at USD, and international students from both Spain and Morocco. The diverse array of people provided a unique and constructive classroom environment, which allowed me to maximize my international educational experience. The program also gave me the chance to learn from both international instructors and USD professors about the intricacies of global business. Having such high caliber professionals teach in this type of program was essential for providing a well-rounded education in a global context. Finally, the guest speakers recruited for the program, which ranged from entrepreneurs to working businessmen/women, also enhanced the overall quality of the program. It was inspirational to hear some of the speaker’s first hand experiences in global business and their views on some of the major challenges they encountered during their careers.

Visit to IBM Innovation Center in Casablanca, Morocco

Visit to IBM Innovation Center in Casablanca, Morocco

There was also a major cultural component that was constantly emphasized throughout the trip. The activities organized by program liasons had cultural depth and exposed the students to some of the cultural differences between the United States and countries such as Spain and Morocco. Major activities included guided walking expeditions, organized bus tours, and planned dinners at some iconic local restaurants. All the activities enhanced the cultural elements of each destination and gave all the students a better understanding about the flow of life in other societies.

Exploring Morocco

Learning About Moroccan Tapestry from the Experts

Overall this opportunity has really help broaden my global perspective, particularly from a business standpoint. It was interesting to see firsthand the pivotal role cultural differences can play when conducting or developing a business in another country. There are many variables to think about especially when constructing the proper business strategy and dealing with local legal and political constraints. International business is a complex and dynamic environment that requires individuals to have innovative and critical minds such as the ones USD targets to develop.

Innovating in Class: Special Topics in International Management with Dr. Zimmermann

Innovating in Class: Special Topics in International Management with Dr. Zimmermann

I was most impressed by the different societies and cultures at each of the destinations we visited on our journey. For example, I was amazed to learn about some of real economic hardships facing the Spanish working population in the current day. It was even more astonishing to feel the people’s resilience, determination, and unity when they spoke about overcoming the difficult economic situation they face. Also, I was shocked to learn how harmonious and connected the people are with one another in an area such as Morocco. In spite of having three very distinct and conflicting religions practiced throughout the country, there is little violence and negativity regarding this topic. These interactions make me feel extremely lucky to participate in a study abroad program such as the recent one to Spain and Morocco. I look forward to sharing my adventures with many others in the future and hope to participate in another study abroad program soon enough.

Cultural Exposure in Morocco

Cultural Exposure in Morocco