Tag Archives: MBA class

A Perfect Ending of My MBA Experience – Vivian Ma

Life as a student is enjoyable especially when you get involved in an Ahlers Center’s study abroad program. My second time studying abroad in the emerging country of Peru and my last time joining the Ahlers Center for an international program as a MBA student has given my whole MBA learning experience a perfect ending. The GSBA course of Latin American Business Environment was short, intensive, yet harvestable.

Firstly, during the two day on-campus classes, we learned the conceptual frameworks, managerial skills and background knowledge to help us make more knowledgeable decisions when it comes to formulating and implementing business strategies in Latin American countries. 

Secondly, it was always our unique advantage that we were scheduled for company visits during program. The most impressive one for me was the visit to Belcorp’s headquarters in Lima. Their vision contributes to the empowerment of women in Latin America, to awaken and build women’s capabilities, so they can imagine a better future and make it happen. On the day of our visit, it happened to be the International Women’s Holiday and they launched a campaign of red lipstick to symbolize women as warriors. We were involved in this campaign as well. I was so grateful, humbled and inspired to be there on that day and part of their vision.
Thirdly, besides the class itself and the company visit, there were two more amazing parts of this trip. We engage in a culinary tour on bike, which not only allowed us to cover more ground to visit places of interest, but gave us more flexibility and connectivity to the city as opposed to the standard bus tour. After finishing the class, we had the opportunity to explore a world miracle, Machu Picchu. We experienced four seasons, the rains, clouds, and sunshine, all in one day to get an amazing view of Machu Picchu city. It is just like a life’s journey. When you experience obstacles or tough times, you really enjoy and treasure the happy times more. 

It is so true that the USD MBA study abroad programs are a real beauty in that it provides multiple opportunities to enable myself to fulfill a transformative journey, including hands-on consulting projects with big companies, national level support for entrepreneurs and so on. Life is never easy, but thanks to USD and to the Ahlers Center for International Business, I am more confident and well-prepared for my future. I would love to help promote these trips in my home country and get more and more people benefit from these awesome program.

To check out more student experiences, please visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

Consulting for Multi-Billion Dollar Companies in Munich – Asad Naqvi

The real value of an MBA along with the enormous multi-disciplinary knowledge that it inculcates, spanning across all critical business functions, is the international experience it can provide to help students develop a global mindset. A global perspective means being open to new ideas, issues and solutions. It will give business leaders an opportunity to explore changing ways of uncovering new business opportunities and evolving to implement leaner business models. It means being culturally sensitive and willing to learn from others. With businesses getting increasingly global and interconnected, an international perspective has become a skill every aspirational business leader must possess.  Working for LEDVANCE in Munich, was a wonderful platform to simulate the experience of working as a consultant for a multibillion dollar organization. It gave us a chance to get a pulse of the working culture in Germany, especially since the organization had booked a conference room for us to work within its premises. The lunch and coffee breaks allowed us to connect with other employees, learning about the business culture in Europe. More importantly, these meetings were pivotal in helping us seek a deeper understanding of the firm’s business and the electrical lighting industry. We leveraged these tidy bits of information to tailor our suggestions to the executives at the company. The experience has certainly equipped me with better decision making tools for European markets, by highlighting the differences and synergies between the business etiquettes and environment in the continent.

To check out more student experiences, please visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

Business Environment in Spain, Portugal, and China – Angel Wu

Angel (Shengdi) Wu made the journey to Lisbon and Madrid, experiencing a contrast of Portuguese and Spanish business etiquette to that of her native country, China. Please enjoy reading her perspectives on European and Chinese cultural practices, and how to have cultural-awareness while conducting international business.

Time flies, two weeks’ intersession in Europe passed quickly in the blink of an eye. My overall impression on Europe is complicated. I was completely absorbed in the rich culture, accumulated through the long development of the civilization. We visited art centers, img_0238witnessed the perfectly reserved architectures from the last two centuries, watched various classical concerts such as Flamenco in Spain and Fado in Portugal, and tested various authentic European food and drinks such as Sangria, wines and fresh-made breads with garlic shrimps. However, on the other hand, I was a little disappointed by the current economic statues of the European union countries. Once dominated the sea and colonized many countries around the world to acquire a great deal of fortunes, Spain and Portugal today are no longer prosperous as before and struggling to get out of the economic crisis.

In terms of culture and business differences between China and Europe, the most important element that China and Europe share in common is the long historical development. Both China and Europe entered their respective first golden age at about the same time: 500 BC. However, European culture heritages, including ancient castles and old antiques, are better preserved img_0564than the Chinese counterparts, as both the civil wars and the world wars destroyed lots of historical sites in China. As a result, on the whole, the modern facilities such as elevators in buildings are more spread in China than European countries. A single writing language and a 90% Han-nationality dominated population shaped roughly homogenous cultural traditions in China, while multiple languages and varieties of populations created different culture traditions among European countries. The differences could also be traced to the concept of family. For instance, Chinese view the benefits of the whole family over individuals so that an individual has his duty for the family. Europeans focus more on an individual’s freedoms and rights. Although we could feel the socialism influence in both continents, Europeans enjoy much higher benefits from their governments while Chinese do not.

img_0433When it comes to business, Europeans focus more on the technology and quality, such as some famous luxurious brands – Gucci, Louise Vuitton, BMW cars and so on. Chinese place greater importance on cutting costs, which inevitably harms the quality. However, both Europe and China are complimentary to each other from the market angle. China has huge market potential and production capacities, while Europe has advanced technologies that could be more quickly applied in China. Europe could conquer the Chinese market more quickly by transferring new technologies to China and setting up local production.

 

Another noteworthy fact is that China is thriving thanks to the fall of communism and the rise of img_0327the capitalism. Europe is falling thanks to the rise of socialism and the fall of capitalism with no easy way out. The rigid, inefficient labor market, in most European union countries, has become probably the largest stumbling block to development of the economies within the European Union. For instance, in the United States, a company in decline could lay off its employees according to its needs without any compensation. While in Europe, the rigid labor law made it even unaffordable for a company to fire a permanent employee. In China, employees laid off by a company are compensated to some extent. As a result, in many European countries, a vicious circle happens as permanent workers in a company might look forward to being fired, and thus companies operating in Europe tend to hire more temporary workers instead. The astonishing unemployment rate at as high as 30 percent makes people question whether it is really beneficial for the economic development of a country to join the European Union.

img_9962To do business in Portugal, some business etiquettes should be kept in mind. Don’t ask about a person’s background or age or exaggerate your gestures. As for punctuality, it is common to be late. For instance, arriving 10 minutes late for a meeting is ok. You will need to make a call if you will be late by more than 20 minutes or request to reschedule the meeting after 30 minutes. Portuguese people are very friendly and sincere about what they say. As is the case with China, personal relationships are very important in business, and people prefer to do business with someone they trust. Thus, it is advisable to seek a mutual contact and build up some credibility with Portuguese businessmen before starting to negotiate with them, a practice shared by Spanish businessmen as well.

In Spain, sufficient time should be allowed to get to know your partners well before any negotiation as a sound relationship is an integral part of successful business negotiation. For instance, before the formalities of meeting, you should spend some time discussing some general informal subjects, such as the weather, family or traveling arrangements. It is really important to follow up with the completion of a business deal and reinforce personal relationships. It is acceptable to invite business partners in Spain to some informal social gatherings. In general, Spanish people value their families, personal relationship and cultural traditions. They enjoy leisure activities to the fullest. Business dress code is very important in Spain as Spanish people will perceive one’s appearance as indication of professional achievement and relative social standing. It is advisable to address with elegance, especially for a dinner. Many high-quality restaurants have a formal dress code. Unless you are a tourist over there, you should always avoid shorts or slippers. Lastly, it is worth mentioning that some rules about giving gifts during business meetings. Spanish people don’t usually give gifts to each other, while inexpensive gifts could be allowed at the end of a success negotiation. Corporate gifts or books are welcome gifts. It is important to know that Spanish people are brand and quality conscious, so high quality items are preferred.img_0440

To check out more student experiences, please visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

People Before Profits – Judy Halter

Judy Halter traveled to Mondragón, Spain this past summer, studying the models of participatory leadership in a global context. Please enjoy reading her perspectives on business, philosophy and the importance of the cooperative model.

“Now having an increased knowledge of the many positive social outcomes for cooperative management, I ask how can we incentivize people to work for cooperatives again? An economist made a presentation for us during the week and mentioned “that it would be rare for anyone to currently creatimg_4927e a startup in the coop model.” The dynamics that were in place in the late 1950s when MCC was created were very different than today’s environment. We learned that even by the 1990s, people were joining coops for practicality reasons, not for higher purpose or perceived societal benefits. Though I personally believe and appreciate the positive societal outcomes from people coming together to work for each other instead of an individualistic approach, my beliefs are not the norm. So I ask, what is going to bring the appreciation of solidarity and democratic management back into favor?

I feel that our changing employment demands could possibly create a scenario where people will appreciate the work and be willing to sacrifice the funds for the greater good. Gallop in May 2016 reported that 13.7% of people are underemployed in the US. Underemployment is a form of cooperative tenets taking place in the sense that people want to work so much they willing to take jobs beneath their skill level in hopes of future mobility. As our economy continues to be disrupted by technological Mondragon 15advancements, our employment avenues are changing rapidly. Will there be a time of retraining workers? How long will that take? Will workers, in hopes of belonging to a community and making a contribution, consider a cooperative model? Possibly, only time will tell. I truly concur with Dr. Herrera’s belief regarding man’s need to contribute and evolve through his work. The cooperative model may be one of the more acceptable means of providing full employment when jobs are declining in availability. Allowing more people to work for less and spread the opportunity to work, might be one of the solutions to keeping people engaged, contributing and connected. I also believe that the cooperative pay scale could be one of the quickest ways to solve income disparity if applied in corporate America. That being said, capitalism is one of the founding pillars of American society, but my hope is that we can dial back our consumption in an effort to put people before profits, which is the foundation of the MCC.

Mondragon 6I am so thankful for the enlightening week in Mondragón. The cooperative tenets align with me philosophically, and I believe corporate America has an opportunity to integrate some of the best tenets of the cooperative model: equity, democratization, participatory leadership, and education. Some of our best companies in the US (ie. Google, Wegmann, Boston Consulting Group) maintain some of the cooperative tenets. They receive high marks from their employees on “best places to work.” Utilizing a system similar to the cooperative model, these American companies have created a strong, unified culture where people take pride in their work and collaborate. I believe this engaged dynamic occurs because the companies strive to put their employees before their profits similar to the cooperative principles of people before profits. In America, we have leadership that implements similar philosophies; we just need other leaders to be inspired as well.”

To check out more student experiences, visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

Innovation and Cooperation in Mondragón

This past summer, Jessica Kort traveled to Mondragón, Spain to learn about the role of the environment and community in innovation and entrepreneurship. Please enjoy reading her perspectives on the philosophy of business, leadership, and life.

“It is extraordinary that this course on Models of Participatory Leadership is offered in Mondragon. Beyond being a unique yet entirely enlightening topic for students of business, it is invaluable to learn about this style of leadership that is uncommon for us in the United States. Were Mondragon 2it not for the financial aid, I would have been unable to travel and study in Mondragon. I truly treasured the experience because being immersed in the culture that generated this philosophy of business and leadership added complex layers to my understanding of it.

It was one thing to read about Mondragon cooperatives’ competitive advantages and astounding success from campus in San Diego. It was another entirely to see where it all began, speak face-to-face with beneficiaries of this way of business and of life, experience the culture that inspired it and watch its creations in action. Visiting the headquarters of the cooperative umbrella corporation, the cooperative factory floors and cooperative university brought theMondragon 9 narratives to life. We digested the forces and motives that drove visionaries to create cooperatives in the Basque region while sharing traditional Basque meals with beneficiaries of their foresight. We studied the economic theory behind cooperatives and walked the halls of a stunning university later created to teach and embody that cooperative structure. We mulled over how Catholic Social Thought laid the foundation of values that inspired the cooperatives’ founders to construct something better for their community in the 1950s, and trekked to a symbolically designed basilica erected and dedicated to the community in that same decade. We learned about another people’s perspectives on wealth, happiness, progress, independence and fairness.
Mondragon 1The course content gave me much to consider as an entrepreneur, and the trip reminded me that our environment has as great a role in our creations as we do. We cannot design or innovate in isolation. We must observe our surroundings and take stock of other people’s needs and perspectives to generate workable solutions and community change. I am currently applying what I learned to my nonprofit work. I’m drawing useful comparisons between cooperatives’ growth in their cultural environment and collaborations in the San Diego social sector. I will remember what I heard from cooperative workers as I look for ways to incorporate qualities they cherish about their professional environment. It was so inspiring to witness their commitment to and belief in the cooperative model, and I hope to emulate those feelings of dedication to work and livelihood here.”

Mondragon 8

To check out more student experiences, visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

Closing the Gap: An American Experience with Argentine Economics

In January 2015, graduate student Elizabeth Tanner participated in the intersession course (Global Entrepreneurship for Social Change) program in Buenos Aires, Argentina and got a first-hand look at Argentine economics, including a growing wealth gap, which has been affected by both domestic political and financial instability starting in the 20th Century.

One of the ten wealthiest states during the 19th Century — a result of prosperous trading with European countries, flowing immigration and rich natural resources — Argentina began going through political and financial stability, as did much of the world, during the two World Wars. Add in political instability, degenerating fiscal policies and a domestic currency crisis in 2001, and socioeconomic inequality rose immensely.

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The closing dinner for the students in Buenos Aires; Elizabeth Tanner is second from the right.

Fast forward to 2015, Elizabeth Tanner was able to see and experience how Argentinian businesses are working to decrease that gap. “The role of business and entrepreneurs [is] in finding solutions to the wealth gap, creating and providing sustainable jobs, and improving the social climate in Argentina… Many business and entrepreneurs are taking an active role in driving social change through business initiatives. We witnessed this first hand through site visits during our course in Buenos Aires,” said Tanner.

Outside of the classroom, the participants went on numerous site visits to companies and organizations who are directly modeling their company goals and practices towards helping decrease poverty and grow the middle class. Tanner commented, “I was most impressed by Fundación Avina. We visited their Argentine headquarters in Buenos Aires… At Fundación Avina, they are addressing social challenges by creating sustainable profitable ventures. We learned about their efforts in Argentina. In the slums of Buenos Aires (and every metropolitan area globally), there are a subset of people who create income by picking through garbage and reclaiming the valuable and reusable waste… Waste pickers are an important part of our society [as they] are preventing landfill and assisting in achieving environmental sustainability and reclaiming commodities.” However, because they are working informally, their rights and leverage concerning wages. Fundación Avina, in response, has created cooperatives that unite the workers and enable them to get higher wages. On the legal end, the philanthropic group has worked on pushing public policy to formally recognize these workers.

View of Buenos Aires at sunset from the hotel.

View of Buenos Aires at sunset from the hotel.

Overall, Tanner’s experience has shown her how many businesses around the world are concerned just as much, if not more, about the ethics surrounding their practices and goals as they are with their bottom line. “The Golden Rule is moving to the forefront of many entrepreneurial efforts globally and businesses are prioritizing social responsibility. In addition, individuals and businesses are recognizing that sound business models and sustainable revenue flows can benefit social initiatives in creating long standing change,” Tanner said.

Strangers in a Strange Land: Finding Love Abroad

In the fall of 2009, two young strangers, an Italian man named Nicolo and a Spanish woman named Anna, decided to embark on study abroad programs to the United States from their respective universities of Bocconi in Italy and EADA in Spain. Little did either know how much of a journey their time during their exchange programs would be.

Nicolo and Anna first met at their exchange student orientation hosted by the Ahlers Center, and soon developed a friendship while both living in Mission Beach and sharing a class and the same friend group. Two months later, the two multinational friends developed strong feelings for each other, and on their first trip to New York City during Thanksgiving, they officially became a couple. Fast forward five years, and the European couple are now happily married and living in Andorra.

Niccolo (center) and Anna (second from the right) in San Diego.

Niccolo (center) and Anna (second from the right) in San Diego in 2009.

Anna commented on her unexpected fairytale, “When I first met Nico at USD, I couldn’t have imagined that after almost 5 years I would be married to him… We have spent much of our relationship traveling and working together in countries such as Italy, Switzerland and Spain, and now we are living in the small but breathtaking Principality of Andorra. We are both so thankful to the University of San Diego for the study abroad opportunity that brought us to each other!”

Niccolo and Anna at their 2014 wedding.

Niccolo and Anna at their 2014 wedding.

International experiences bring so much more to the participants than what’s learned in a classroom or in tourist trap destinations; unexpected positive outcomes, such as the romance between Anna and Nicolo, can be hiding around every corner, waiting to be discovered. Although it may make you slightly nervous and take some courage, temporarily leaving your country on your path of higher education during international programs will expand your horizons and forever change your world in one way or another.

Do you have a similar story to share? Please comment below!

Buenos Aires: The Phoenix of Latin America – Glimpses of Checkered Past Through Irresistible Present

 

Written by 1st year International Track MBA Student, Swastik Mukherjee

Long called the Paris of South America, Buenos Aires is exactly that, and yet so, so much more besides. Granted, this is a city of wide boulevards and French-styled palaces, but it is one too of wildly exciting innovations and new styles. From the state-of-the-art museums like the MALBA, to the thrilling renaissance of the tango, Buenos Aires now buzzes with a contagious, creative energy and a brash new self-confidence. Sexy, alive and supremely confident, this beautiful city gets under your skin. Like Europe with a melancholic twist, Buenos Aires is unforgettable.

Buenos Aires

Avenida 9 de julio, one of the major wide boulevards in Buenos Aires, Argentina

The above snippet is what I took with me to Buenos Aires, on my first study abroad session with The University of San Diego in January 2015. Upon my arrival, I realized how big of a challenge the language barrier would be. I did not know a word of Spanish and the prospect of spending 3 weeks in a country without being able to communicate was scary rather than daunting.

But little did I know that this city does indeed have an intoxicating effect on its visitors. The language barriers were overcome with gestures and smiles, the inability to read street signs or knowing the difference between “caballeros” and “damas” were balanced by the infectious love and hospitality of the locals of Buenos Aires. Who could tell that one of my best days in the city would be one when I would meet six people from Brazil who did not know a word of Spanish or English. This is why we travel, this is why we do an international MBA. To know that what we perceive as differences aren’t differences at all; they are opportunities. Opportunities for us to grow and learn and cherish and admire.

Getting the opportunity to take the Social Entrepreneurship class in Buenos Aires was an eye-opener. Learning about the different bureaucratic styles of government and the ways to do business and the ways to tackle the severe headwinds that entrepreneurs face made me realize how much we take our lives in the United States for granted. Visiting the recovered factories where people work on meager stipends and seeing the efforts they make to keep the people happy and engaged was also a humbling moment. At one point, you stop asking questions of standards of safety and quality and realize that those questions are irrelevant to their aspect of life. These people are working to make ends meet, not to have global levels of quality or safety. Life as we know it, is not how they live it.

Visit to Sume Materiales

Global Entrepreneurship for Social Change Class Visit to Sume Materiales

For the practicum, I had an excellent team that combined four unique individuals with different industry experience and backgrounds. We were working with Wal-Mart Argentina and the project that we were assigned to was complex and challenging. But the team rose to the challenge and figured out very quickly what was expected of us as deliverables. The team fed off each other’s strengths and ensured that the final product was over and above what the client had expected and thus ensured the client’s satisfaction and possible further interaction in the near future.

USD Students gaining some international consulting experience at Walmart Argentina

USD Students gaining some international consulting experience at Walmart Argentina

Being on a trip such as this, I was joined by a wonderful group of people, friends from my cohort and some new faces from the evening and second year MBA. Suffice to say, we bonded pretty well. We bonded over steaks and Malbecs, empanadas and cervezas, financial models and feasibility analysis and the collective goal of making the best of our time in Buenos Aires. (Read this post to find out more on how to make the most of your experience in Buenos Aires) With a group of high-thinking and highly ambitious students and individuals, the recipe was ideal for ultimate success or disaster. I am glad to say that it was the former. There were differences that crept in but none that we could not resolve amicably. Our local administrator helped make sure we were regularly informed of things that are happening in and around town along with info on study sessions, group meetings, currency exchange and local hotspots to check out for dinners and drinks.

Typical Argentine dinner: steak, wine and good company

Typical Argentine dinner: steak, wine and good company

My experience in Argentina can be summed up in three words: enlightening and privileged. It taught me a lot, both academically as well as personally. It was a privilege to be in Argentina, doing the class and the project with a great bunch of people that I would love to work with again.

Swastik

Swastik Mukherjee on the right and Joe Bird – MBA students at Suma Materiales company visit

Practicum Experience

Company: Wal-Mart Argentina

Project Scope: The project entrusted to us was complex yet intellectually stimulating. The main points were:

1) Analyze current accounts payable process and suggest improvements.

2) Use the suggested electronic invoicing process and make it leaner.

3) Come up with a financial and economic feasibility model for the electronic invoicing go-live

Solution presented: Compared the old process to the new and eliminated 5 days of non-value added work in order to implement the new process. Also analyzed cost savings and revenue to come up with a NPV analysis with an IRR that exceeded expectations of Wal-Mart finance personnel. In short, we presented the worst case, management case and best case scenarios and we decided that the project is a go with huge windfalls.

Students Final Presentation at Walmart Argentina

And the room was full of executives… Student’s Final Presentation at Walmart Argentina

What about you? Have you also been to Buenos Aires? What would you recommend for students who will be studying there next year?

Student Semester Exchange Experience in Madrid

 

Written by MBA student Michael Foster.

In the fall of 2014, I had the opportunity to study at IE Business School in Madrid. I recommend to anyone doing an MBA at USD to consider going abroad for a semester as the experience is invaluable to your studies and networking opportunities. The Ahler´s Center makes the transition almost seamless.

IE is ranked as one of the top business programs in Europe, so it attracts extremely diverse and talented students. The professors are a mix of academics and business professionals. Classes often have guest speakers that offer great insights into the European markets. Most recently we had speakers from Realza Capital and MasterCard.

Viewed from Mike Foster's balcony in Madrid

View from Mike Foster’s balcony in Madrid

Living in Madrid has also been a great experience. It’s very pedestrian friendly with a great public transportation system. Gone are the days of sitting on the 5 to go a few miles. Madrid is a world-class city with a rich history. The architecture is amazing and the museum options are incredible. If you attend IE, I highly recommend living in either Malasaña or Chueca. Both these neighborhoods are centrally located and only a few metro stops from the school.

A big advantage of living in Madrid is that flights abroad are cheap. I had the opportunity to spend a week in Morocco. The culture in North Africa is almost the complete opposite of Spain’s, so it was a real eye opener. I spent a few days in Marrakech, Casablanca, and Rabat.

USD´s IE students in Morocco

USD´s IE students in Morocco

If you are considering going abroad for a semester, I definitely recommend IE Business school. The courses I took while in Madrid were: Applied Corporate Finance, Private Equity and Financial Statements, Trillion Dollar Challenges, Bootstrapping for Startups, Corporate Governance, Bottom of the Pyramid, and War, Sales, and Marketing.

MBA Student Michael Foster

MBA Student Michael Foster

Global Entrepreneurship and Social Change Course

MBA students traveled to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil In January 2013 and 2014 for the course, Global Entrepreneurship for Social Change. The course is offered in Buenos Aires, Argentina in January 2015. The purpose of this course is to learn what is possible and how, by examining a myriad of diverse experiences that are making a difference all over the world. Through readings, case analysis, guest speakers, and experiential exercises students gained an understanding of the processes for translating good ideas and intentions into high-impact ventures. Students acquired knowledge, tools and skills that enhanced their capabilities for identifying and developing opportunities. The course called for an exploration of what students can do by developing financially viable ideas for on-going enterprises for which positive social and environmental impact is essential.

We live in a world filled with complex global challenges. It is also a time of opportunities for making a difference. In this context, the way we pursue and achieve social change must be “revolutionized” through fresh paradigms for solving the world’s diverse pool of problems: environmental degradation, increasing inequality gap in the United States and other industrialized societies, famine in an era of obesity, obesity in a world with extensive hunger, lack of access to potable water by a large majority, persistent illiteracy and isolation in the time of the Ipad and Facebook, among many others. Entrepreneurship for social change is about combining business and management skills, imagination, passion, and the courage of individuals to effectively tackle some of these issues. It can be found across sectors and takes different organizational forms and business models.

Student experiences follow:

“Human beings who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so”   ~ Douglas Adams; I believe that this quote encapsulates why going abroad to Rio de Janeiro was such a rewarding experience for me.  We were exposed to a variety of social ventures (Afro Reggae, Saude Criancia, Rio-Ro, Asta, etc.) and we were able to learn from their successes and pitfalls.  We were able to analyze business models that were successful and obtain a firm understanding of what a social enterprise truly is and the type of impact that it can make on the world.” – Christopher Franklin, Evening MBA

student experience

“The course in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, opened up a whole new perspective on doing business. The visits to social businesses, meeting the social entrepreneurs as well as the classes by Professor Marquez were highly impressive and made me realize that doing business can be used to change the world. The beauty of the country and its people are the perfect setting to get inspired and be creative to develop your own social business ideas.” – Ann Sophie Loehde, Dual-degree IMBA with WHU

“In Rio de Janeiro we dove into a rich world of ideas and inspirations behind a variety of social enterprises – a socially responsible and high fashion sneaker company, a sports organization that fuels the desire for change from within for the homeless, and a drug company that valued patients more than its own bottom line.  Then we visited local favelas (Brazilian slums) where people had started their own businesses to make a change, and suddenly ideas that were flat on paper stood on their feet.  Some of then danced and sang, like in the case of AfroReggae; some of them dazzled and flashed, like in the case of Mulheres de Salguero… The stories we learned from these cases not only gave us frameworks to develop the seed of our own ideas, they also sparked a fire of motivation in our bellies.” – Tina D’Amore, IMBA

Students of Global Entrepreneurship for Social with Prof. Patricia Marquez

Students of Global Entrepreneurship for Social Change with Prof. Patricia Marquez

“The guided city tour on the weekend took us to the famed landmarks of Rio and enabled us to enjoy the charm of this former imperial capital of a once major European power.  That night we were treated to the Brazilian food and music culture, first with a decadent churrascaria dinner and then a visit to a Samba School. Putting this in perspective with the revelations of various social issues – from the tours we had to the Afro-Reggae movement in Rio’s favelas and the Mulheres de Salgueiro workshop – [the course] gave us a new insight into how two worlds can exist not just in one city, but within one person.” – Danidu Wijekoon, IMBA

What about you? Have you participated in a course abroad that inspired you to develop a business that will have a positive social and environmental impact in the world?