Tag Archives: continuing education

A Cultural Journey – Jennifer Syed

As an Indian, going back to India through our university for a study abroad session was a very fulfilling and emotional experience. To learn about the contrast of business environments made it fulfilling, whereas noticing the cultural difference between the US and India made it emotional. Our study abroad course, “Innovation in Emerging Markets,” headed by Dr. Rangapriya Narasimhan was the perfect course to understand the business differences and approaches used across the US and India. As our cohort consisted of students from different parts of the world. like Germany, China, Turkey, Spain, United States, and Italy, seeing them adjust to the culture difference showed the major cultural variances between India and the US.

Students enjoying some leisure time after company visit day in the traditional attire of India: “Salvar Kameez” and “Bindi”

Coming to the difference in business environment, India in many business ways runs on “jugaad,” that is where different things are cobbled together to make it work somehow. Whereas in the United States, due to the detailed processes, every business transaction follows a proper and similar structure. In business terms, the presence of institutional voids in India makes it challenging to enter a market and makes it an emerging economy, whereas the structure that follows most of the business practices in the United States makes it more organized with less of risks.

Students enjoying traditional Indian vegetarian food called “thali”

Moving on to the cultural difference between India and the US, without a doubt, India and US are culturally pretty different, in terms of languages, eating habits, clothing, religious beliefs and many more to count on. Seeing the students adapt to the difference in the culture was remarkable, as being an Indian, I can sense it would have been a roller coaster ride for most of them! But coming to the commonalities in the differences, both the countries have amazing people to help you and smile at you and that was what led most of the students to thrive through the cultural differences.

Company visit at the Indian Oil Corporation in rural India, Bhiwandi

India being home has always given me a very patriotic feel to it as the culture and life there symbolizes courage, tolerance, love, family and kindness. The US is becoming a second home to me with the kind of opportunities, growth and motivation it gives out as a country to people from different parts of the world. Having the opportunity to experience both the countries in a business and cultural context has given me a deeper understanding of the intricacies of culture that drives the business in both the countries.

To check out more student experiences, please visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

An Unforgettable Adventure – Jeremy Sebastien

“Shanghai was my first trip to Asia and I approached the situation with an open mind and excitement to experience a new adventure. From the time that I got off the plane, Shanghai was complete sensory overload. The smell of food, the people, and the sounds of motorbikes honking as they drive past are omnipresent. There is an undeniable energy present in the city.

I have been fortunate enough to travel to other parts of the world. As an American, it is relatively easy to navigate most areas because of a clear western influence and common usage of English. Shanghai was different—in a good way. Not much English is spoken and the written language does not have any recognizable characters. When the journey started, I felt like a fish out of water. It didn’t take very long to feel at home in China.

Shanghai is an interesting blend of modern and ancient. The city is extremely cosmopolitan. A walk through Xintandi could make one feel like they are in New York City. Nanjing Road—with its bold neon signs and endless shopping—draws people into the spirit of the city for an evening stroll with no destination in mind. On the other hand, I would walk down that same road first thing in the morning and was amazed at how the main street looked like it was from the future, but the alleyways that branched out looked like they hadn’t been changed in centuries.

We had a job to do in Shanghai. The client that my team worked for was an up-and-coming agency that had a young staff and bold ideas. From d ay one, the company treated us as their own. They took us out to lunch and always made sure that we felt comfortable in the office. We were even invited to an after-work event and the invitation was extended to the rest of the Intersession group. We played dodgeball and laughed all night. It was one of the most memorable nights of the trip.

Our client gave us the freedom to explore ideas for the project. It was exciting to be a part of a newer firm that allowed its employees to act in an entrepreneurial way. It was also exciting to see that China is a growing and interesting place to do business. The country is expanding its reach and it was interesting to see the almost endless potential.

The study abroad program was one of the reasons that I decided to attend USD. My experience exceeded expectations. We were put into a new environment with a new culture and a new company. With that framework in place, we had the opportunity to take what we wanted from the trip. I came into the experience with the objectives of learning a new business culture and stepping out of my comfort zone. I wanted to take on an intellectual challenging project while experiencing life on the other side of the world. I left with much more than I wanted. I left with new friends, a broader global perspective, and an adventure that I’ll never forget.”

To check out more student experiences, please visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

In the Spotlight – Katrin Kandlbinder

Each year, the Ahlers Center welcomes international short-term scholars and researchers to the University of San Diego campus. Such visitors contribute to the Center’s vision of creating dynamic and globally robust environments in and out of the classroom. These scholars collaborate with USD faculty on various research projects and support the faculty in their academic endeavors.

We are delighted to have visiting researcher Katrin Kandlbinder with us for the current spring 2017 term. Katrin is a doctoral candidate at the International Real Estate Business School of the University of Regensburg in Germany. Working with USD’s Dr. Norm Miller, Katrin is conducting joint research on the United States housing market and how information efficiency affects real estate markets over time. She will be presenting her findings, alongside Dr. Miller, at the upcoming American Real Estate Society conference in April. We had an opportunity to sit down with Katrin to see how she has enjoyed her new home city of San Diego.

What has been your favorite experience in San Diego thus far?

I enjoy the weather, walking along the beach and especially the people. Everyone in San Diego has been so friendly and I have found it really easy to make friends. People are very willing to meet you and take the time to get to know you here. I have been very impressed with how willing people are to help strangers.

What is one thing about San Diego that you found surprising?

I think the public transportation system could be improved. I was surprised, for a city this large, that the public transportation is not more efficient. Everyone here has a car. And a dog! It seems that everyone in San Diego owns at least one dog.

What do you think you will miss most about San Diego when you return to Germany in April?

I will miss the weather, the ocean, and the open mindedness of the people.

Where are you living in San Diego?

I have an apartment in Little Italy which I love. The neighborhood is wonderful with plenty of shops, restaurants, cafes, bars and activities right outside my door. I joined a yoga studio close to my apartment and every Saturday I shop at the Little Italy farmers market.

What are some of your hobbies?

I enjoy yoga, visiting friends, and swimming. I play the saxophone and I also take voice lessons. So I love music!

What is something that you tried for the first time in your life in San Diego?

Clam chowder. Wow, it’s great!

What is something you have not yet tried in San Diego but hope to do before you leave?

I would love to try to surf. I am waiting for the weather to be a bit warmer and then I plan to try to surf for the first time.

People Before Profits – Judy Halter

Judy Halter traveled to Mondragón, Spain this past summer, studying the models of participatory leadership in a global context. Please enjoy reading her perspectives on business, philosophy and the importance of the cooperative model.

“Now having an increased knowledge of the many positive social outcomes for cooperative management, I ask how can we incentivize people to work for cooperatives again? An economist made a presentation for us during the week and mentioned “that it would be rare for anyone to currently creatimg_4927e a startup in the coop model.” The dynamics that were in place in the late 1950s when MCC was created were very different than today’s environment. We learned that even by the 1990s, people were joining coops for practicality reasons, not for higher purpose or perceived societal benefits. Though I personally believe and appreciate the positive societal outcomes from people coming together to work for each other instead of an individualistic approach, my beliefs are not the norm. So I ask, what is going to bring the appreciation of solidarity and democratic management back into favor?

I feel that our changing employment demands could possibly create a scenario where people will appreciate the work and be willing to sacrifice the funds for the greater good. Gallop in May 2016 reported that 13.7% of people are underemployed in the US. Underemployment is a form of cooperative tenets taking place in the sense that people want to work so much they willing to take jobs beneath their skill level in hopes of future mobility. As our economy continues to be disrupted by technological Mondragon 15advancements, our employment avenues are changing rapidly. Will there be a time of retraining workers? How long will that take? Will workers, in hopes of belonging to a community and making a contribution, consider a cooperative model? Possibly, only time will tell. I truly concur with Dr. Herrera’s belief regarding man’s need to contribute and evolve through his work. The cooperative model may be one of the more acceptable means of providing full employment when jobs are declining in availability. Allowing more people to work for less and spread the opportunity to work, might be one of the solutions to keeping people engaged, contributing and connected. I also believe that the cooperative pay scale could be one of the quickest ways to solve income disparity if applied in corporate America. That being said, capitalism is one of the founding pillars of American society, but my hope is that we can dial back our consumption in an effort to put people before profits, which is the foundation of the MCC.

Mondragon 6I am so thankful for the enlightening week in Mondragón. The cooperative tenets align with me philosophically, and I believe corporate America has an opportunity to integrate some of the best tenets of the cooperative model: equity, democratization, participatory leadership, and education. Some of our best companies in the US (ie. Google, Wegmann, Boston Consulting Group) maintain some of the cooperative tenets. They receive high marks from their employees on “best places to work.” Utilizing a system similar to the cooperative model, these American companies have created a strong, unified culture where people take pride in their work and collaborate. I believe this engaged dynamic occurs because the companies strive to put their employees before their profits similar to the cooperative principles of people before profits. In America, we have leadership that implements similar philosophies; we just need other leaders to be inspired as well.”

To check out more student experiences, visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

Optimizing your Global Supply Chain #3

3 Seminars: May 13, 18 & 20.

Prices include all 3 seminars.

In our hyper-competitive world of international business, building, managing and sustaining a global supply chain is critical. Regular supply chain issues must be addressed in innovative ways. There are a number activities companies should focus on in order to optimize their supply chains. These include properly controlling costs, mitigating supply chain risk and complexity, pursuing cross-functional alignment, implementing green practices and attracting and retaining appropriate talent.

Although sound supply chain management practices are not always followed, crafting and executing a thoughtful supply chain strategy is critical–and the benefits are huge. A well-oiled supply chain can go a long way in enhancing global competitiveness and achieving higher profits. It could also be the difference between success and failure.

Learning Objectives:

  • Design and execute a sourcing strategy aligned with your firm’s needs
  • Identify best practices and key performance metrics in managing your supply chain
  • Develop a “green” supply chain strategy that makes financial sense for your firm
  • Identify sources of supply chain risk and complexity and describe methodologies to mitigate
  • Recognize the importance of supply chain innovation to a firm’s survival

Total Seminar Hours: 9

Seminar Leader

Joel SutherlandJoel Sutherland is managing director of the Supply Chain Management Institute and an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego. Previously, Sutherland was with Lehigh University and taught at the University of Southern California.

Sutherland has more than 30 years of experience as a supply chain executive working for multi-billion dollar companies in various industries, including aerospace, automotive, paper, pharmaceutical, food and third-party logistics (3PL).

He received his B.S. degree from the University of Southern California and an MBA from Pepperdine University, has dozens of published papers and articles and is a popular speaker at industry meetings and universities around the world.

He received a number of honors including the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) Distinguished Service Award; the Professional Achievement Award from Logistics Management magazine; recognition as a Top 20 Logistics Executive by CLO magazine and the Logistics and Supply Chain Forum; and honored as a Thought Leader by Supply Chain Quarterly and DC Velocity magazines.

Strategic Growth, Financial Profitability and Free Cash Flow Valuation #2

3 Seminars: March 19, 24 & 26.

Price includes all 3 seminars.

This seminar will help participants develop tools for understanding how firms plan (or should plan) for growth, and manage it throughout the firm and industry life-cycle. From early-stage startups to major public corporations, the growth of sales, cash flows and value is at the front and center of decision making. We will examine how industry forces (national and international) impact decision making, and will consider how ratio analysis helps identify potential areas of concern and guide us towards improving the performance of an organization. In addition, we will examine scenarios that call for a decision to expand, be acquired or acquire another firm. Current public financial information and case study analysis will be utilized through the seminar.

Learning Objectives:

Module 1: Financial Statement Analysis

  • Construct from scratch the three most used financial statements (Balance Statement, Income  Statement and Statement of Cash Flows)
  • Identify the various groups of ratios used in time series and cross-sectional analysis, and articulate how they impact
    current valuation
  • Use ratio analysis on a mini-case

Module 2: Planning for Growth

  • Distinguish between accounting and economic profitability and how a company can stay afloat financially during
    periods of growth
  • Articulate how the various parts of a company deliver growth and the impact on cash flow
  • Compare and contrast internal and external growth for sustainable financial planning

Module 3: Three-Year Detailed Simulation of Running a Small Business

  • Develop initial position, plan for inputs acquisition, working capital and capital asset acquisition, and read
    accompanying accounting statements

Total Seminar Hours: 9

Seminar Leader

svetina jpgMarko Svetina joined the University of San Diego ‘s School of Business Administration in 2008 after obtaining his PhD in Finance from Arizona State University. At USD, he teaches graduate and undergraduate corporate finance and investments courses. His research interests include the role of private equity in mergers and acquisitions, the impact of local clienteles on the precision of analyst forecasts, accelerated share buybacks and performance and competition of exchange traded funds (ETFs). Professor Svetina is frequently recognized as one of the outstanding professors within the School of Business Administration at USD.

Reverse Innovation – Why Would a Rich Man Want a Poor Man’s Product?

Corporations need to “change the very definition of innovation from the ‘value for money’ to the ‘value for many,’ and the ‘value for many’ is about doing more with less. – Dr. Vijay Govindarajan

Dr. Vijay Govindarajan, Coxe Distinguished Professor at the Tuck School of Business Dartmouth, New York Times and Wall Street Journal Best-Selling Author presented on the concept of “Reverse Innovation” (below, his book co-written with Chris Trimble) on October 16, 2014. This theory demonstrates that innovations are increasingly originating from developing nations and being transported (sold) into developed nations, in contrast of the traditional opposite flow of innovation.

“I can tell reverse innovation is going to fundamentally change every industry in the next several decades,” Dr. Govindarajan said. “It perhaps represents the single greatest growth opportunity for corporations. It’s going to impact manufacturing, consumer goods, healthcare, education, transportation, energy… you name it.”

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 11.34.05 AM

Taken from http://www.amazon.com/Reverse-Innovation-Create-From-Everywhere/dp/1422157644

Dr. Govindarajan began by discussing the common question surrounding why reverse innovation can work, which he describes as: “Why would a rich man want a poor man’s product?” He then spent the rest of his presentation discussing various examples where reverse innovation has successfully occurred.

The first example he uses is healthcare, an area of interest for both developed and developing countries alike. General Electric (GE), known for its medical imaging equipment, produces an electrocardiogram (ECG) machine, which is used in preventing heart attacks. Its retail value in the United States is $20,000, with a usage price of about $200 per scan. Dr. Govindarajan noted that in India, only the most wealthy people and hospitals can afford those costs, as most of rural India only receives $2 per day in income and has little or no access to hospitals and trained physicians. However, as he mentions, “non-consumers still have the same necessities as consumers,” and thus both the wealthy and the non-wealthy are at risk for heart attacks and are in need of ECG machines. From a business standpoint, Dr. Govindarajan says, in relation to consumers and non-consumers, “The single-biggest growth opportunity of corporations today is to turn non-consumers into consumers.”

General Electric shares similar viewpoints as Dr. Govindarajan, as they developed an ECG machine whose retail price is $500 and each scan costs 10¢. The machine is small and lightweight, allowing for easy mobility, as well as works on battery (as opposed to the $20,000 model, which only uses electricity) and its operating system is much simpler to use. Therefore, people in places such as rural India will have the income, mobility, and training needed to transport and effectively operate the machine so many more people will be ECG consumers than before. This new model is currently sold in India as well as 194 other countries, and through whose sales is generating financial growth for General Electric in the United States.

His other examples included other healthcare-related markets, such as surgeries and artificial limbs, all with the same outcomes of “pushing the price performance paradigm” (doing more with less) that Dr. Govindarajan says is fundamental is reverse innovation. He further demonstrated that the reason American companies are so hesitant to approach innovation with this model is because they are “poorly positioned to capture this opportunity,” meaning they have excellent capabilities but they approach international innovation with American models and logic rather than those of the cultures in which they are innovating. Using examples relating to Kelloggs and ESPN innovation efforts in India, Dr. Govindarajan explained how corporate cultural relativism can increase profits and spur real innovative progress.

photo3

Dr. Govindarajan concluded with remarks on the need to change the types of fundamental questions and definitions of innovation from “transporting” global strategy from one country to another to identifying and assessing the problems of the specific non-consumers of the targeted region.

His research supports the notion that corporations need to “change the very definition of innovation from the ‘value for money’ to the ‘value for many,’ and the ‘value for many’ is about doing more with less. It’s about doing a lot more with a lot less for a lot of people, and that requires that frugal thinking, that frugal innovation… Poor people have the same needs as the rich, desires as the rich, [and] ambition as the rich, why can’t they have the same access to opportunity? That’s the essence of reverse innovation.”

If you missed this exciting International Speakers Series presentation or would like to to watch it again click here.

Global Demographic Trends and Marketing Opportunities – Class #3

3 Seminars: October 15, 22 and 29.

Price includes all 3 seminars.

This 9-hour seminar is tailored for those professionals who would like to take a thoughtful glimpse into the near future, exploring questions such as: Why is it that gray may become the new green? Who are “kidults” and how do they affect the marketplace? Why is water called the oil of the 21st century? When does “Old Age” begin and what does it have to do with a washing machine? Why are we talking more and more about the “Easternization” of the West?

3 seminars:

These and other questions will be discussed during the seminar that will focus on global demographic, environmental, cultural, and economic trends. This journey into the future will be focused on identifying current developments in the marketplace as marketing opportunities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize major global trends that are shaping the future
  • Distinguish global trends from fads
  • Identify marketing opportunities for your business
  • Identify four features of global trends that have the power to shape the business marketplace
  • Produce a Market Opportunity Analysis Report

Total Seminar Hours: 9

Leader

Kniazeva

Associate Professor of Marketing, Maria Kniazeva joined USD in 2003. She earned her Ph.D. in Management with a specialization in Marketing from the Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California, Irvine, and her Masters in Journalism from Leningrad State University in St. Petersburg, Russia. Kniazeva was awarded the Edmund Muskie fellowship (1994-95) and American Association of University Women International fellowship (1997-98). Two major streams of research mark Kniazeva’s academic activity: cross-cultural consumption in the global marketplace and storytelling on food packages and beverage bottles. Moving in the first direction, she centers her research on the theme of the Easternization of the West. In particular, Kniazeva is interested in the concept of authenticity. With her second stream of research, she explores how marketing stories, like those on bottled water affect and reflect consumer behavior. A qualitative researcher, Kniazeva has also been mastering videography as a research method and has produced and presented at international consumer research conferences in Brazil, Japan and the UK two documentary films. Kniazeva has published in the Journal of Business Research, Journal of Consumer Behavior, Journal of Food Products Marketing, and Consumption, Markets and Culture Journal. Her academic publications also include two book chapters. Kniazeva spent her sabbatical year of 2010-2011 collecting data and doing fieldwork in France, Russia, India, Kenya, and Tibet/China, having visited for the purpose of her research a total of 16 countries.

Prior to USD, she worked as a visiting professor at Georgetown University, McDonough School of Business in Washington D.C. and also taught a marketing course at the University of California, Irvine, the Paul Merage School of Business. Kniazeva serves on the Editorial Boards of three international journals: the Journal of Global Academy of Marketing Science and the Journal of Global Fashion Marketing headquartered in Seoul, South Korea, and the International Journal of Consumer Research. She is an invited Associate of the Research Centre “Wine, Place, and Value” at Reims Management School, France. An ethnic Russian, Kniazeva formerly lived in Estonia where she worked as an executive editor of a newspaper and a free-lance business consultant to foreign investors. She authored a book published in English and Russian, titled America Through the Eyes of a Russian Woman. The English version was published on the grant Kniazeva was awarded by the United States Information Agency.

Global Demographic Trends and Marketing Opportunities – Class #2

3 Seminars: October 15, 22 and 29.

Price includes all 3 seminars.

This 9-hour seminar is tailored for those professionals who would like to take a thoughtful glimpse into the near future, exploring questions such as: Why is it that gray may become the new green? Who are “kidults” and how do they affect the marketplace? Why is water called the oil of the 21st century? When does “Old Age” begin and what does it have to do with a washing machine? Why are we talking more and more about the “Easternization” of the West?

3 seminars:

These and other questions will be discussed during the seminar that will focus on global demographic, environmental, cultural, and economic trends. This journey into the future will be focused on identifying current developments in the marketplace as marketing opportunities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize major global trends that are shaping the future
  • Distinguish global trends from fads
  • Identify marketing opportunities for your business
  • Identify four features of global trends that have the power to shape the business marketplace
  • Produce a Market Opportunity Analysis Report

Total Seminar Hours: 9

Leader

Kniazeva

Associate Professor of Marketing, Maria Kniazeva joined USD in 2003. She earned her Ph.D. in Management with a specialization in Marketing from the Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California, Irvine, and her Masters in Journalism from Leningrad State University in St. Petersburg, Russia. Kniazeva was awarded the Edmund Muskie fellowship (1994-95) and American Association of University Women International fellowship (1997-98). Two major streams of research mark Kniazeva’s academic activity: cross-cultural consumption in the global marketplace and storytelling on food packages and beverage bottles. Moving in the first direction, she centers her research on the theme of the Easternization of the West. In particular, Kniazeva is interested in the concept of authenticity. With her second stream of research, she explores how marketing stories, like those on bottled water affect and reflect consumer behavior. A qualitative researcher, Kniazeva has also been mastering videography as a research method and has produced and presented at international consumer research conferences in Brazil, Japan and the UK two documentary films. Kniazeva has published in the Journal of Business Research, Journal of Consumer Behavior, Journal of Food Products Marketing, and Consumption, Markets and Culture Journal. Her academic publications also include two book chapters. Kniazeva spent her sabbatical year of 2010-2011 collecting data and doing fieldwork in France, Russia, India, Kenya, and Tibet/China, having visited for the purpose of her research a total of 16 countries.

Prior to USD, she worked as a visiting professor at Georgetown University, McDonough School of Business in Washington D.C. and also taught a marketing course at the University of California, Irvine, the Paul Merage School of Business. Kniazeva serves on the Editorial Boards of three international journals: the Journal of Global Academy of Marketing Science and the Journal of Global Fashion Marketing headquartered in Seoul, South Korea, and the International Journal of Consumer Research. She is an invited Associate of the Research Centre “Wine, Place, and Value” at Reims Management School, France. An ethnic Russian, Kniazeva formerly lived in Estonia where she worked as an executive editor of a newspaper and a free-lance business consultant to foreign investors. She authored a book published in English and Russian, titled America Through the Eyes of a Russian Woman. The English version was published on the grant Kniazeva was awarded by the United States Information Agency.

Reverse Innovation

Mr. Govindarajan will discuss the breakthrough idea of reverse innovation. Historically, multinational companies innovated in a rich country like the United States and sold their products in a poor country like India. Reverse innovation is doing exactly the opposite. It is about innovating in a poor country like India and selling those products in a rich country like the United States. This presentation will focus on three issues: Why is reverse innovation a significant growth opportunity for American corporations? Why is it so hard? How does one win with reverse innovation?

Lunch will be served. Please RSVP: http://goo.gl/8JuQ5v 


Vijay Govindarajan is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on strategy and innovation. Mr. Govindarajan was the first Professor in Residence and Chief Innovation Consultant at General Electric, and worked with GE’s CEO Jeff Immelt to write “How GE is Disrupting Itself”, the Harvard Business Review (HBR) article that pioneered the concept of reverse innovation. In addition, Vijay has published a book titled “Reverse Innovation” which was a New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller. Prior to joining the faculty at Tuck, he was on the faculties of the Harvard Business School, INSEAD (Fontainebleau) and the Indian Institute of Management (Ahmedabad, India). Mr. Govindarajan received both his doctorate and his MBA with distinction from the Harvard Business School.