Category Archives: China

An Unforgettable Adventure – Jeremy Sebastien

“Shanghai was my first trip to Asia and I approached the situation with an open mind and excitement to experience a new adventure. From the time that I got off the plane, Shanghai was complete sensory overload. The smell of food, the people, and the sounds of motorbikes honking as they drive past are omnipresent. There is an undeniable energy present in the city.

I have been fortunate enough to travel to other parts of the world. As an American, it is relatively easy to navigate most areas because of a clear western influence and common usage of English. Shanghai was different—in a good way. Not much English is spoken and the written language does not have any recognizable characters. When the journey started, I felt like a fish out of water. It didn’t take very long to feel at home in China.

Shanghai is an interesting blend of modern and ancient. The city is extremely cosmopolitan. A walk through Xintandi could make one feel like they are in New York City. Nanjing Road—with its bold neon signs and endless shopping—draws people into the spirit of the city for an evening stroll with no destination in mind. On the other hand, I would walk down that same road first thing in the morning and was amazed at how the main street looked like it was from the future, but the alleyways that branched out looked like they hadn’t been changed in centuries.

We had a job to do in Shanghai. The client that my team worked for was an up-and-coming agency that had a young staff and bold ideas. From d ay one, the company treated us as their own. They took us out to lunch and always made sure that we felt comfortable in the office. We were even invited to an after-work event and the invitation was extended to the rest of the Intersession group. We played dodgeball and laughed all night. It was one of the most memorable nights of the trip.

Our client gave us the freedom to explore ideas for the project. It was exciting to be a part of a newer firm that allowed its employees to act in an entrepreneurial way. It was also exciting to see that China is a growing and interesting place to do business. The country is expanding its reach and it was interesting to see the almost endless potential.

The study abroad program was one of the reasons that I decided to attend USD. My experience exceeded expectations. We were put into a new environment with a new culture and a new company. With that framework in place, we had the opportunity to take what we wanted from the trip. I came into the experience with the objectives of learning a new business culture and stepping out of my comfort zone. I wanted to take on an intellectual challenging project while experiencing life on the other side of the world. I left with much more than I wanted. I left with new friends, a broader global perspective, and an adventure that I’ll never forget.”

To check out more student experiences, please visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

International Practicum: iPai in Shanghai

MBA student Emily Lapp recently traveled to Shanghai, China for an international consulting practicum. These are her reflections:

MBA students burn incense at a temple in Zhujiajiao

MBA students burn incense at a temple in Zhujiajiao

“Just prior to my final semester in the University of San Diego’s MBA program, I decided to participate in an international consulting practicum during the 2016 intercessional period. On New Year’s Eve, I boarded a plane and, 13 hours later, touched down to greet the new year in a new country: China. An often discussed but frequently misunderstood country, China is primarily known for being heavily populated (almost 1.4 billion people) and a chief export partner to the United States; many products sold here in the US are produced within China. Yet, most Americans have never been to China and lack firsthand experience of the country. While studying the history and culture of a country can improve one’s understanding, there is little that can compare to firsthand experience. Given China’s significance as a growing nation with an ever increasing role in global business, I decided a trip to China would significantly aide in my understanding of global business by exposing me to both daily life and business in China.

MBA students attended the first auction held in iPai’s new office in Shanghai.

MBA students attended the first auction held in iPai’s new office in Shanghai

The company selected for the China practicum consulting project was “iPai,” an American-owned auction company in Shanghai. Our group was divided into two teams and assigned topics. My team’s job was to identify opportunities for improvement in the company’s organizational structure and work flow processes. While our professor was on-site to oversee the project and provide valuable feedback, we were entrusted to set meetings with the client, organize our efforts and ultimately, decide what recommendations would best assist our client. The project was much more open-ended than a typical MBA assignment and the timeline much more condensed. Not only did my team have to take care to accurately assess the company’s current situation and ensure we effectively communicated with our client to understand their desired outcome, but we also had to quickly assess the strengths of each team member while making time critical decisions as to how best to tackle the workload. Being in a foreign country, far away from the normal resources of USD and working for clients whose Chinese employees spoke little English, added to the project’s complexity. In the process, I learned a great deal about cultural norms in China, particularly related to organizational structure, and took away many tips for doing business in China. In the evenings, after a long day of work, our team was able to get out and enjoy the wonder that is the city of Shanghai.

MBA students and faculty visit the Yuyuan Gardens in Shanghai on a city tour

MBA students and faculty visit the Yuyuan Gardens in Shanghai on a city tour

After an intense ten days of working on the project, it was time for our final presentation to the client. I was eager to share our team’s hard work and, after the presentation concluded, felt a great sense of satisfaction. I knew our work for iPai was not just academic in nature, but would actually be used to further develop and grow the company. I truly enjoyed putting the skills I’ve learned during the past two years of my MBA program to great use for a company. I found the entire international practicum experience to be incredible. I know for a fact that it has greatly contributed to my personal understanding of the world and further enhanced my global mindset. I highly recommend an international practicum to all MBA students. I can promise that you will not regret it!”

To check out more student experiences, visit our Study Abroad blog page.

Information on international opportunities can also be found on our website.

Erin’s Travel Tips for Shanghai

Shanghai

Overview:

Shanghai is a financial hub in Asia and widely considered to be China’s most European city, with its distinctive, futuristic architecture, historical French Concession neighborhood, and myriad of high-end fashion houses with elaborate, glittering window displays beckoning well-heeled tourists and locals alike.

If you plan on travelling to China, make sure to obtain a tourist visa, as this is required for stays that extend past 48 hours.

Shanghai holds an important place in the international financial market, and is home to the Shanghai World Financial Center (SWFC) in the Pudong District.  Rising to a height of 492 meters, the SWFC is the world’s tallest mixed-use urban development center.

View from the observation deck on the 97th floor of the SWFC

View from the observation deck on the 97th floor of the SWFC

 Business Etiquette

1)   When meeting business partners, acknowledge seniority for introductions, seating arrangements and general interactions.

2)   When exchanging business cards, present your card so that it is facing your recipient.  When accepting a business card, take the card with both hands and take a few moments to read the card carefully.  Do not fold or write on business cards.

3)   Respect the concept of “saving face” – avoid insulting, criticizing, or drawing negative attention to someone in front of others

Don’t Miss:

1)   The Bund: stroll along the river and enjoy the sight of barge “rush hour”.  Across the river, gaze at the massive high-rises in the Pudong District.  Right off The Bund on East Nanjing Road, you’ll find the Fairmont Peace Hotel.  This is a historic landmark that was constructed between 1926 and 1929, and now contains an updated art-deco lobby, jazz club, upscale café and tea room.

View of along the Bund, looking towards the Pudong District across the river.

View across the Bund, looking towards the Pudong District across the river.

2)   Old Town: to feel as if you have transported back in time, visit Shanghai’s Old Town (known as Nánshi) where you’ll find traditional architecture, a bazaar with numerous shopping stalls and the Yù Yuán Gardens, which was the former residence of Ming-dynasty officials and is now available to tour.

3)   French Concession: two distinct shopping areas are contained within the Shanghainese neighborhood known as the French Concession – Xintiandi and Tianzifang.  Xintiandi houses dozens of upscale shops and boutiques, restaurants and nightspots, and is partitioned into two sections.  The south block holds an indoor mall with fine-dining and shopping options, while the north block has more of an outdoor market feel, with boutiques and numerous restaurants offering a wide assortment of cuisines.

Another shopping district, Tianzifang, has less of a 5th Avenue in NYC feel and more of an artsy, old-Shanghai feel.  There are dozens of trendy boutiques, tourist shops, cafes and local fashion houses to explore along the traditional alleyways.  I recommend stopping here to find your souvenirs and fun gifts for friends and family at home.

4)   Temples: two interesting temples to visit are the Jing’an Temple and the Jade Buddha Temple, both located in the Jing’an district.  The Jade Buddha Temple is an active place of worship for Buddhists, and has a number of gold, jade and marble Buddha statues, with colorful flags, lanterns and candles adorning them.

Inside the Jade Buddha Temple

Inside the Jade Buddha Temple

Foods to Try:

1)   Noodles: with a multitude of small noodle shops throughout the city, you are sure to find something to appeal to your palate.  I found the udon at Kung Fu Noodles to be the perfect lunch on a cold winter day!

Udon noodles from Kung Fu Noodles, located in the French Concession

Udon noodles from Kung Fu Noodles, located in the French Concession

2) Dumplings: they come filled with many different ingeredients, but a Shanghainese specialty is the “little steamer buns” and the “scallion -and sesame-seed-coated dumplings”.

3) Hotpot:  commonly served in the winter, hotpot offers sizzling broth to dip vegetables and meat into, finishing them with a variety of sauces.

Shanghainese Cuisine: for Westerners unaccustomed to generous amounts of oils and spices in their food, it is advised to ask for an English menu and sample the various dishes in small quantities, to learn which dishes appeal most to your taste buds and dietary preferences

Shanghainese Cuisine: for Westerners unaccustomed to generous amounts of oils and spices in their food, it is advised to ask for an English menu and sample the various dishes in small quantities, to learn which dishes appeal most to your taste buds and dietary preferences

What about you? What are your go to food items when traveling through China? Share your tips below.

~Erin Kellaway, External Programs Manager

Road Less Traveled in Hong Kong

Hong Kong is complete eye candy.  Everywhere you turn there are vibrant colors, exotic smells and a hum of activity.  Besides being a shopping mecca and home to the world’s most inexpensive Michelin starred restaurant (Tim Ho Wan), Hong Kong also boasts a lively night life, exceptionally efficient public transportation system, and plenty of stunning parks to keep even the greenest of thumbs well entertained.

Personally, I am a gardenoholic.  In a city of 7.2 million people, nearly all of which are living vertically in high rises, the quite repose and sound of running water emanating from many of Hong Kong’s public parks offers a reticent opportunity to reflect and observe.  Most often I’m reflecting on what local taste treat sensation I will dine on next, but who’s counting?…

Hands down my two favorite green spaces in Hong Kong are Kowloon Walled City Park and the Nan Lian Gardens at Chi Lin Nunnery.  Both are free to enter and if you make a point to visit Kowloon Walled City Park early enough, you will catch groups of locals practicing Tai Chi by the waterfalls.  Close to the Chinese New Year celebrations, flag throwing groups also use Kowloon Walled City Park as their rehearsal grounds for the festive parades in which they perform.  Nan Lian Gardens houses a pagoda, waterfalls, koi pond, and more manicured trees than a Dr. Seuss book.  It also pipes in soft music throughout the 3.5 hectares to optimize your relaxation and is home to a vegetarian restaurant with unique dishes focusing on local ingredients.

Kowloon Walled City Park in Hong Kong

Kowloon Walled City Park in Hong Kong

Visitors to Hong Kong often like to spend some time exploring at least one of the 234 outlying islands which also constitute part of special administrative region of Hong Kong.  Generally, western tourists flock to Lantau Island to see the giant seated Buddha and catch the marvelous views from the cable car ride up to the top of the mountain.  But if I have free time to go island hopping, my go to is Cheung Chau.  Just an hour ferry ride from Hong Kong island, Cheung Chau is where the locals go for some of the best seafood around and fantastic people watching.  The whole island can be explored on foot but its also fun to rent bicycles to venture out past the main drag.  Hiking trails on the island also offer spectacular seaside views without having to climb too much elevation.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGS5ACisi6E[/youtube]

Looking to take some pretty spectacular photos in Hong Kong?  You can’t beat the view from Victoria Peak or the colors offered at the Flower Market.  The Yuen Po Street Bird Market is also pretty unique where you can see sacks of live grasshoppers on sale alongside ornate birdcages of all makes and models.  The added bonus of being serenaded by hundreds of birds while floating through this market make it a place I return to on each visit to Hong Kong.  Of course it also helps that the Bird Market is literally situated on top of the Flower Market so its easy to visit both on the same day.

The Flower Market in Hong Kong

The Flower Market in Hong Kong

One of my favorite past times in Hong Kong is heading to the horse track.  Situated in central Hong Kong Island, the race track at Happy Valley turns into Hong Kong’s largest bar every Wednesday evening during the winter months.  Overpriced beer and chain smokers aside, the races at Happy Valley are truly stunning as the Hong Kong city skyline serves as the backdrop for the race track and the convivial atmosphere of locals and expats cheering together rarely disappoints.

Happy Valley Races

Happy Valley Races

Those participating in our MSRE or GSBA courses in Hong Kong will be happy to know that visits to the Nan Lian Gardens and Victoria Peak are part of the city tour itinerary which is included in your program fee.  Additionally, I coordinate a night at the races for each student group where dinner at the Hong Kong Jockey Club and entrance into the Happy Valley Racetrack are both part of the fun included in your program fee.

USD business students at Victoria Peak

USD business students at Victoria Peak

Have you been to Hong Kong? Share your tips below!

~ Allison Howitt, Academic Programs Manager

 

 

Student Recommendations in Asia: What Do You Know Now That You Wish You Would Have Known Before Traveling on This International Program Abroad?

Every year, in our post-program surveys, we ask our students for feedback on things they wish they had known about a specific location prior to going there to study. In this blog post we compiled answers to this question from our graduate students who experienced life in Asia as part of one of our programs. We hope that this information will help other students in the future!

Shanghai, China:

Shanghai, China. Picture by easyvoyage.com

Shanghai, China. Picture by easyvoyage.com

“Bring vitamins. Learn even more of the language. Reach out to friends or people you may know that are going. Pack light.”

“Smog can be bad. Be open to wearing a mask”

“Having a good understanding of PowerPoint and solid presentation skills can be very handy if you are doing a practicum.”

“Chinese rarely ever have napkins at restaurants…or you pay separately.”

“I didn’t really know what to expect going to China, but I had a great time. I would advise future students to really take advantage of sightseeing the first couple of days (or coming earlier to staying later) because once the project starts we were very busy!”

Hong Kong, China:

Hong Kong, China. Picture by chinatraveltrends.com

Hong Kong, China. Picture by chinatraveltrends.com

“I knew that Hong Kong is a good tourist destination but my knowledge about it having such a huge impact on every business around the globe was limited. Now I know that Hong Kong is one of the main links between the eastern and western parts of the world.”

“In order to buy an Octopus card at the airport, you need to have Hong Kong Dollars. I should have gone to an ATM before purchasing a train ticket from the airport so that I could have bought an Octopus card at the airport.”

“Do some research to figure out good places to eat before going. Also figure out where to exchange money and where not to exchange money.”

“Research: general tips on adjusting to a new time zone/avoiding jet lag. Research places to eat before going out. Most of us weren’t using smartphones while there and weren’t able to look up places to eat on the fly; also we couldn’t understand Chinese names of places when walking by. After a few days of learning the lay of the land this got a lot easier, but at first it was a little tough to find places to eat nearby that weren’t really overpriced tourist restaurants.”

“Learn some basic useful words/phrases in Cantonese. They are easy to look up, and I bought a Cantonese dictionary; but it would be helpful for everyone to have a basic cheat sheet.”

“The importance of having medicine to keep from getting sick!”

What about you? Have you studied abroad? Do you have any other suggestions for people who are going abroad this Intersession? Post your comments below.

Students Testimonials – Consulting Projects Abroad During Intersession 2014

“The course practicum is an opportunity to really find out who you are in the international business world, at a graduate level.  I went to Buenos Aires after two and a half years in the Evening MBA, and I can say that this short international consulting opportunity challenged me far more than my 10-plus years of experience in executive management and business ownership.  I started the Evening MBA program because, while my businesses had been successful, I knew I could be a more effective, stronger manager, of both people and processes.  This experience made me confident that the time and money I have spent on my USD MBA were well worth it!  I had a fantastic team that brought together 4 completely unique people with different ages, levels of experience, and educational backgrounds. In a short period of time, we figured out how to assess the client’s needs and meet them using each team member’s strengths, benefiting not only the client, but each other, as we bound together to achieve success!”  Jennifer Knotowicz, MBA student 

Shanghai 2014

“The International Practicum in Shanghai was one of the most challenging a fulfilling experiences in my MBA career.  As consultants, we were exposed to real business problems that forced us to think outside of our own comfort zone and learn how business is conducted in a completely different culture.  This gave us invaluable experience in working as a team to achieve a significant amount of high quality work under extreme circumstances.  Professors Zimmerman and Bates did an excellent job of guiding us through the consulting process, stretched our thinking about international business, and helped us manage the client for superior results.” Zachary Miller, MBA student